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I am working on a slab on grade rambler in the fridgid Minnesota. I am looking for input on how to keep the slab from sucking all the heat out of the house in winter.
 

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The house is gutted right now. Slab on grade is not very common around here and I am unsure if carpet pad will be enough to prevent cold carpet. Just wondering about the various products that are out there, if any, other than polystyrene.
 

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Thom
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The polystyrene will work if you run it from the frost line up the foundation wall to the top of the concrete. Won't work well though. If termites are an issue there, they love the foam. They don't eat it, it just makes a nice way for them to tunnel into the home from outside.

There are better ways to do this but it requires being installed prior to the installation of the slab.
 

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If you're just looking for interior fix, the XPS with a floating platform of two layers plywood laid in opposing directions glued and screwed will work. The two layers prevent prevent the "potato chip" effect of having just one. This is what's done sometimes around here for basement slabs that were never insulated. If this is the first floor of a multi-story building though, you'd probably run into code problems for stair risers. Not sure what your HDD are, but 2" should suffice for vapour barrier. Without more details it's difficult to provide guidance.

Exterior wise, CMHC has a good guide book for determining horizontal skirting insulation
length to move isotherms away from the slab:
http://publications.gc.ca/collections/collection_2011/schl-cmhc/NH15-457-1998-eng.pdf

Another case study for slab on grade in Minneapolis
http://www.buildingscience.com/documents/profiles/etw-minneapolis-profile
 

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There are insulated floor tiles available for that purpose. I can't remember what they are called but you can get them through Home Depot. They are made in Canada, the Canadians got it down on dealing with cold climates.
 

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Grand parents had a slab on grad ranch in SE WI. Failry unusual there too for a residence. ALso worked work at a church across the street. The rectory was a 2 story slab on grade.

Not that bad really. About the only thing you can do after the fact is insulate the exterior of the footing with sheet insulation. 18-24" deep most likely. This will keep the real cold and frozen ground from sucking heat away from the edges of the slab. The interior generally does a decent job of mainting temp. Not much different than an un-heated basement.

Carpet and pad work to take the edge off a cool slab and insulate a bit.
 

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The only other thing I have used here in WI, provided stairs are not an issue, is to install a ditra type product. Firm plastic that provides an air space/thermal break between slab and plywood floor. They also have 2x2 osb tiles with a plastic sleepers laminated to the back. Good luck
 

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My house is on a slab in NE MO.Single digits & below zero are not uncommon temps. 2x4 walls, so I'm assuing r13 insulation at best. House heats really well. Once the concrete is warm, it stays warm. Cools well in the summer too.
 

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Thanks fellas. I'm thinking the most realistic option is cork or some other type of insulating underlayment. And I stuffed the walls with R-15 :)
 

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There are insulated floor tiles available for that purpose. I can't remember what they are called but you can get them through Home Depot. They are made in Canada, the Canadians got it down on dealing with cold climates.
Old thread, but doesn't look like anyone answered this. I assume you're referring to DriCore tiles.
 
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