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Hi!

Looking for some general guidance on the technique involved in skim-coating. Potential client asking for an estimate, but I have never skim coated an entire wall.

Any help would be appreciated!

Thanks!

Richie-C
 

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I skim coat with pre-mix mud, USG blue lid type. Some use the metal box to hold the mud in as they work, I never got comfortable with that. I usually just use a 6" stiff blade and a 12" taping knife. Apply about 1/8" thick with the 6" about 2 sq. ft., and blade off with the 12". Wax on, wax off. Thin coats, I'm only trying to fill the low spots. I do about 4 foot across and then down to the floor. Then another 4 foot, then down, etc. After the first coat is dry, if done right, you shouldn't have to sand it. Run the stiff 6" across the surface to knock off ridges, chunks, and bumps before applying next coat. Concentrate on the edges along the ceiling, base etc. because those are easy to miss by 1/8" or so. If you get mud on an adjoining surface, no sweat, sponge it off after it dries. Assume at least 3 coats depending on the condition of the wall, or until you get the hang of it. If done thin, you can usually start the next coat immediately, because where you started will be dry by the time you finish the wall. Good luck :Thumbs:
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Skim-Coating?

Pro-Wall--thanks a mill. I am decent with spackling/patching, but have never skim coated a wall. This helps tremendously!

Richie
 

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One method I use for doing larger surfaces is to thin down the mud like you would for stomping a ceiling. I then use a roller to "roll" the mud onto the surface to be skimed or "re-surfaced".

Then take your 6" or 10" blade and "take it off". Be sure and have your blade at an angle...you want to leave a small paper thin amount behind...(unless you like sanding ;) ) Work some of the mud with the knife upto and down to the area's you cannot get with the roller. IE corners, ceiling / crown molding or baseboards.

The thinned mud will not set-up as fast and allows you to work a larger area at a time. (effeiciency=profits) Plus the thinned mud provides for less wrist fatigue. I use the Sheetrock USG light blue lid "Topping"

You should be able to re-surface a wall with a minimum of 3 coats upto about 6 for the worst conditions like a nasty wallpaper removeal where lot's of the drywall paper has come off in the process.

I've also done this on repaints where a homeowner has painted prior and has left a heavy stiple, ropes etc.

Put it on...take it off....end results are smooth wall with minimum sanding.

-Martin :)
 
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