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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
If this topic has been touched before, my sincere apologies... I tried to find info around before asking this...

So I have this piece of oak that is is 45" x 30" by 1 1/2" ...
I want to make a 3/8 angle cut along the whole 45" length... what would be the best way to do it???

Thank you guys
 

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I think he wants to make a chamfer on the edge of a piece of countertop.

There is a diy forum, also a woodworker's forum.

With this size piece of wood, and this heavy, it is best to bring a tool to the board, so in this case us a router with a chamfer bit. You may clamp a guide to the workpiece or find a bit with a bearing guide.

Incidentally, I have found that a roundover is much better than a chamfer because the chamfer is always worn at the two "points" whereas a roundover has no "points". I have tried chamfers and after a few years they start to look ratty.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Hahahaha Thank you guys for the DIY advice... but I am actually a carpenter in the making... I usually work on commercial construction but right now I am on my first term at NAIT on the carpentry program... most of the time my work is around forming, framing, hoarding... you know, more commercial things, but at school on top of teaching this they want us to learn woodworking... so one of my projects is a cutting board...

So here is where my question pops... I am trying to make a slope... that starts on the North side of the piece, and that gives me 3/8 of an inch less material on the South side of the piece...

A chamfer would give me that angle right at the corner... and if that was the case I would use either a jack plane or a block plane... so I could have better control on the process... but the cut I want starts from zero at the top of the piece and ends at 3/8 of an inch less material...

I was thinking of doing it on the jointer at an angle, but that would not be safe...

any ideas fellas...???
 

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I think he wants to cut a 1/8" in 12 (0.48°) tapper.

Rail saw is the most efficient method.

Shot this video awhile ago.

http://m.youtube.com/watch?feature=c4-feed-u&v=E3wovWUO61Y

Tom
Maybe I'm not understanding the OP correctly, but it sounds like the 1 1/2 piece needs to slope from 1 1/2 to 1 1/8. The 3/8 variance is alone the height, not the length or width if I understand correctly.

Given the size of the work piece, you may be stuck using a belt sander.

I'm sure more options will come along soon.
 

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He states "I want to make a 3/8 angle cut along the whole 45" length" in post 1. In post #4 he states he wants the south 3/8 less than the north. These statements lead me to believe he is looking to make a tapper cut. I rip 8/4 quater sawn white oak with my TS 55 all the time. This top would not be an issue to cut.

If he was looking to cut a bevel the 45", I'd still use my TS 55, just set the bevel to 15°.

Tom
 

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That's all fine and dandy, till you drop something on your foot! :wheelchair:
If I never drop something on my foot, then what?:eek:

I'm sure I shot that in the evening because someone asked a question about cutting tappers. All my videos are one and done, what you see is..........

I do rock those Berks with the white socks.:clap:

Tom
 

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Sounds like a bevel. "North" = top, "south" = underside, if I'm understanding him. The rough way to do it would be clamp a guide for the circular saw, set the angle, and cut. But the tear out would be on top, wouldn't it?
 

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Maybe I'm not understanding the OP correctly, but it sounds like the 1 1/2 piece needs to slope from 1 1/2 to 1 1/8. The 3/8 variance is alone the height, not the length or width if I understand correctly.

Given the size of the work piece, you may be stuck using a belt sander.

I'm sure more options will come along soon.
That's how I understood it too.

If that's the case I'd make a jig with a sled & tapered shims and send the whole kitten kaboodle through a surface planer a bunch of times.

EDIT: just realized its 30" wide. In which case send it to a mill!
 

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You need one edge of the 45" length to be 1.125" and the other 1.5"?

If so ....

*You need a 32" wide thickness planer or sander. You will also need to rip 0" to 3/8" (.375") shims 45+ inches long. Enough shims to support the block through the machinery. Attach them to the bottom, spray 90 would be my choice ... start making passes through the machine.

**would be to create a sled of substantial construction from tapered pieces of plywood. That would hold the piece while being machined. Most 32"+ planer/sanders have the height to accommodate a rather tall lest up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 · (Edited)
Hey Thanks for the video... Unfortunately it is not a taper either... see the taper would be a cut along the length, the cut I am thinking of.. goes along the thickness of the stock... so the length or the width would not change... however the thickness would change... the North side of the stock would remain at 1 1/2 and the South side would have 3/8 less than 1 1/2, so the lenght or the width would not change but the thickness would have and angle...

Maybe I should explain why I want this and that could help... since it is a cutting board... I have notice when I cut juicy things, the juice stays around the board, going wherever there is a low spot... what I want to create is a natural flow down, so when, let's say I cut a watermelon, the juice would just flow down...
 

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So you want to make a huge shim? Only thing I can think of is to make a sled for the board to sit on, and send it through a big planer/sander. Or use a big band saw and jig to re-saw the board? Last option is to do it by hand. Either with hand planes, or an electric hand held plane. If you take your time, you could get there ok.
 

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Maybe I should explain why I want this and that could help... since it is a cutting board... I have notice when I cut juicy things, the juice stays around the board, going wherever there is a low spot... what I want to create is a natural flow down, so when, let's say I cut a watermelon, the juice would just flow down...
Cutting board? :rolleyes:

Glue a couple of guide 1 x 2's on the edges with the 3/8" tapper defined and dado the taper off of it, 3/4" at a time on a table saw, then rip the 1 x 2's off of it and dress it up with a hand plane and sandpaper.

Or just add a 3/8" rip to the underside of one end to create the drainage slope.

:whistling
 
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