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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
we installed a bay window and painted the seat board and head board. we noticed the surface seems a bit rough..is it ok to sand down the seat board and head board AFTER we painted?
 

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Sounds like raised grain. Latex paint? As long as you don't sand to bare wood and you get get it as smooth as you'd like, you will be good to go again with another coat or 2 of paint. In the future you could use oil or shellac primer, over the factory primer if necessary, then latex. Also, you may have done this, but sanding the factory primer coat before paint coats is a good idea, as well as in between paint coats like Tom said. I use 400g in between coats so there are no visible sanding scratches in finish.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
i guess because the bay and bows are laminates and we were worried sanding could ruin the finsih; especially after being painted.. is this a valid concern?
 

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As long as you don't sand through the veneer you won't create any more work for yourself. But if you do, you can always use a filler. It really does depend on how rough it is and how smooth you want it to be as to how much work you'll have. But it's easier painted because even if you put a gouge in it, you can fill it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
the seat board was not primed,it was wood color veneer. it was pained and it feels rough.. can we just sand over the paint a bit..what guage sand paper? we don't totally sand off all the paint?
 

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What do you mean by wood colored veneer...actual wood veneer stained and clear coated? And then you painted over that? Did you sand prior to applying your paint coats? Did you prime? How many coats of paint? How long ago?

When I am prepping bare wood for sanding I work up to 180, then primer, then any in between coat sanding is done with 400.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
no sorry..its just a wood laminate and we did'nt sand or price,just paint..
we just sand over the paint lightly ?
of course we don't want to sand off all the paint?
what guage sand paper?
 

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Okay wood laminate. If you didn't sand that to at least give the paint something to grab, you may not have a great bond. Primer would have been good. Anyway the laminate was smooth, so your roughness is in your paint coat(s) due most likely to dust, etc. falling into your finish as it dried. Depending on how bad it is, you may have to sand down to the laminate to get it all if it is locked into multiple coats. With latex, most especially if it's not fully cured but even if it is, you run the risk of taking off some parts and not others if you do a hard sanding which will leave an edge to contend with that may be difficult to feather because latex is soft. It is difficult to accurately diagnose this without knowing how bad it is, but I would start with some 400 and see if that gets you where you need to be. The purpose of sanding in between coats is to knock off the dust nubs, etc. It is not as much sanding like you do to prep the bare wood as it is scuffing by just running the paper over the surface to smooth it out.
 

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Yes and see where that gets you. You can sand a little harder with 400 because it doesn't cut as fast, but don't get crazy. You could even start with 320 if you want. But like I said, it depends on how bad it is and how good it needs to be for you and your client as to what you will really need to do to get it smooth. I'm just saying be prepared that it may be more than just a little sanding to correct the problem.

A quick painting lesson: Only paint over sound paint that is sanded before hand or properly sanded and primed surfaces. Sand in between each coat except after the last one, of course. The purpose of scuff sanding between coats is two fold. You remove dust nubs from the surface and you give the next coat something to grab on to.
 

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interesting post.. what do most of you guys wipe the veneer with after sanding and before painting to ensure a clean and dust free surface?
Forgot that in my quicky lesson. Yes after any sanding period, you want to remove the dust. I like to use a vacuum with a soft brush attachment, but tack cloths work well too. If you don't, you essentially include that dust in your next coat.
 

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should the cloth be dmap or wet? just a dry cloth?
for got about that question myslef.
There are 4 ways to remove dust from sanding:

1. Brush it off.

2. Tack cloth. It's a cloth made sticky by the apllication of a very thin varnish like material that leaves a gummy residue...on the cloth. You buy it already like that. So "no" on your dry cloth since that won't do much except remove some of it and push the rest around.

3. Vacuum it off. This is what I do because I always have a vacuum close by. I use a soft brush attachment.

4. Blow it off with compressed air.

1&4, however, is putting dust into the air, so they are not the best options.
 
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