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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
not a disaster but close..my guys were installing siding and all of the sidden the nails from the sheet rock on the inside of the home started coming out,not all the way but the heads broke through the dry wall...i never saw this before. the home owner wants us to fix it; i will but i think its faulty work on the part of the contractor they used for the sheetrock. they said it happened on the old and new sheet rock. house was built in the late 1960's. they had tongue and groove on the outside.
anyone ever see this before?
 

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solar guy
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Are you hand nailing?
did you NOT look at the interior before you started?
Do you not have a clause in your contract about this situation.

If you answered yes to any of the above you have a problem and will be fixing their drywall.
Just an aside I bet the house is in not great shape and is in need of a complete interior repaint.
How nice of you to provide this additional service at no cost.
 

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I don't do resides, but I've had nails pop doing exterior repairs...not very often though. CR is right, you will be fixing this. As far as checking the interior before starting work, it's a great idea to make sure, at the very least, nothing is going to fall off the walls during the pounding.

How many rooms? How old is the existing paint? You would really only have to repaint from natural break to natural break, i.e. floor to ceiling and corner to corner of each damaged wall. That is, of course, if the existing paint job isn't complete crap, really old, or some difficult to match finish, i.e. faux. Take a sample of the paint off the damaged wall(s) and a good paint store can match it well enough that it will be difficult to distinguish the difference at the corner transition. I've done it myself. You were trying to do more painting/staining if I recall, right? :)
 

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Project Manager
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This hardly constitutes a disaster.

What were you hand nailing with? A 16 lb sledge?

I see your trade is roofing, I am sure you have a clause in your contracts about re-roofing and the possibility of minor/superficial interior damage...did you not have it on this contract?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
for future reference,what kind of clause could i put in the contract?
we were just hand nailing,nothing out of the ordinary.
 

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i must admit,i don't bother to check the interior either,perhaps this is a wake up call. don't let them take advantage Davinci.
I have a situation where i am short a square of siding and the exposed area is Tyvek. Because its supposed to rain tomorrow and all the supply shops are closed til Monday,the pain in the ass home owner wants me to cover the tyvek with a atrp to protect the house from water. is he friggin insane! what the hell is tyvek for. i told him new homes are left exposed with only Tyvek for weeks and they survive.
 

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What I find odd is how nails are pretruding out from the dry wall when you nailing into studs unless it is some sort of prior faulty workmanship.

Hopefully your contract is worded that you are excluded from this type of damage, considering this is a normal process of the job.

A few years ago we did a job where a guy kept things on the wall although the contract clearly states to remove all items and we also told him to. A deer he had on the wall fell, breaking off an antler. He threatened to sue unless he was compensated the absurd amount of money he felt it was worth. Then our laywer sent him a copy of the contract he signed with the parts highlighted. That was the end of that although I felt bad about the situation.

If you do end up fixing it, make sure it is someone you choose. The homeowner does not have the right to just hire anyone out they want to fix it and then stick you with the bill without you knowing about it first.


Enforcer, people are like that. Most homeowners dont understand anything construction related. Since its such a small area, just do it for him and save the headache of listening to him. OR, do a change order for buying and installing a tarp over that area since I am sure its not in the contract! :)
 

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Davinci,


I've never had this happen to me after hundreds of siding applications.
Are you sure there wasn't nails already pushed out before you started.
I'd check walls I hadn't worked on yet.
If ring shank nails weren't used for the sheetrock you may have a leg to stand on against faulty sheet rock installation.

Was the old siding stripped or are you going over existing?
Is this wood ,vinyl,Cement siding?
If the house was stripped ,did moisture/water get into walls?
I noticed on my house,that as soon as I started using the wood stove(dry heat) I got a lot of screw pops.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
we tore off wood shakes. we installed insulated vinyl siding. was hand nailed. never had this happen before.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
ring shank nailes should ALWAYS be used for sheet rock? any particular kind? what about the thickness of the sheet rock?
 

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Al Smith
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not a disaster but close..my guys were installing siding and all of the sidden the nails from the sheet rock on the inside of the home started coming out,not all the way but the heads broke through the dry wall...i never saw this before. the home owner wants us to fix it; i will but i think its faulty work on the part of the contractor they used for the sheetrock. they said it happened on the old and new sheet rock. house was built in the late 1960's. they had tongue and groove on the outside.
anyone ever see this before?

Judging by the age of the house, its probably 3/8 inch drywall with blued drywall nails in pairs in the field on 16 inch centers. And I'm betting your T&G board sheathing is yellow pine. Yellow pine especially that old is pretty tough to sink a nail into and that extra force is transferrimng through the stud and vibrating the loose drywall nails. When the studs dry out it is common for the nails to be loose. Your guys might want to try using a light weight shingler's or drywall hatchet for the siding as it wont transfer so much momentum through the wall as a 22 ounce heavy handed hammer would.
 

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Al Smith
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ring shank nailes should ALWAYS be used for sheet rock? any particular kind? what about the thickness of the sheet rock?

No but ring shank nails were commonly used in the very early sixties on eight inch centers, Mid to late sixties (in my region anyway) they changed over to large head smooth shank blued drywall nails using wider 16 inch paired spacing.
 

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Another possibility was the rock wasn't tight to the studs in many places and the pounding shook it loose. Never seen 3/8" around here though on any age home, but that's here.
 

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This usually happens when we have to stud nail siding. The tongue and groove should have absorbed this. In any case I have wording dedicated to this issue. I also make a point to mention that artwork be taken down while wer'e working on those walls because we will not be liable. Had an issue one time but the client was cool. From there on I rearranged my contract writing.
 

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. I also make a point to mention that artwork be taken down while wer'e working on those walls because we will not be liable.
Yep, remove all pictures, knick-knacks, hutches against the wall, stuff on shelves, blah blah blah, if you don't want them broke. Even dishes and such in exterior kitchen wall cabinets, as I've had stuff inside the cabs start to making their way towards the doors before from cutting with a sawzall.
 

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Al Smith
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Another possibility was the rock wasn't tight to the studs in many places and the pounding shook it loose. Never seen 3/8" around here though on any age home, but that's here.
It may very well have been tight originally. The problem is lumber shrinkage regardless of the nail being used. Think of it this way. When the house was new the point tip of the drywall nail was at a certain location inside the 3 5/8 inch stud. So what happens to the location of that tip of the nail when the lumber shrinks to 3 1/2 or even 3 3/8?? It doesn't go deeper does it? Nope what happens is the face of the stud against the drywall retreats during shrinkage and the drywall panel is floating on the shank and head of the nail. Start wailing on the sheathing of the house and the drywall panel becomes a drum skin, and pops the joint compound off the heads.
 
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