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Hair Splitter
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The pre slope doesn't have to be perfect---a proper mix helps---makes packing the mud easier---

For the top bed---I simply scribe a line around the pan where I want the wall to meet the pan----and start packing----never tried the plastic gizmos mentioned earlier----couldn't see how they would help---it's just not that hard to sculpture a pan with the wall line and the drain set to work off of.

I always use a square drain cover---Cutting into a round one is much more difficult---
I would say be careful placing your talents and skills on others. While sculpting a bed may come easy to you it doesn't to a lot of us. I can take a photo and draw it in pencil and it virtually looks like a black and white copy. I just get it. I see and my hand draws it. But I would never tell someone that it's easy, just easy for me.

The pitch perfect gives you the perfect pitch from the walls to the drain every time. I know plenty of very talented tile setters who use them.

To the op installing the liner without a Preslope is wrong. Subfloors are level and you need the liner to direct water back to the drain when it reaches the liner. Otherwise you are creating a pool for nasty water to sit and fester. I just pulled a pan done this way and it was nasty. It's the plumbers way of doing it and old school thinking.
 

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Some good info for you Aaron.

I'd like to add a few things. There is a plastic cover for the weep holes that is good. Personally, I use coffee filters cut to fit around the drain and lightly spot glued to hold.

The pitch perfect would be good as a first timer especially if the shower is an odd shape. Later, you might try w/o it as you get more experience.

Installing your liner with a preslope is neccessary. Having the drain raised will help when installing the preslope bed. It needs pitch but doesn't need to be perfect. But you can test your skills here before the final mudbed.

Biggest mistakes after no preslope :
Threshold not sealed correctly, nails too low when attaching cbd, build out of wall because of corners too thick.
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
Thanks all. I don't know if my post came off that way, but I certainly don't have any intention of building this without the pre-slope. The perfect pitch is a good idea. I'll call around to see if anyone local carries them.

Inside corners are cut to accept the vinyl corners, and the walls will be furred out with strips of luan so I can lap the hardie board over the vinyl without screwing up my wall plane.
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
Since the drain has to be replaced anyways, should I just scrap the traditional bed and go with a schluter system? The cut to fit foam base seems like it could be a good option. Or for a first timer, would this be a bad idea?
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
I found a supplier that stocks the quick pitch. With all the reading I've do over the past few days, I feel more comfortable with the traditional pan.

My plaster guy who is working at my house today actually builds a lot of these. I could probably get him to help me out of I get into a pickle.

He is the first local guy who said the plumber ****ed up, so that a good sign...
 

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Wow!!!!!

TNT...MikeWoods...Ozlo...everybody...... GREAT explanations/tips for Aron:thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup:

Specially liked TNT's.... preslope (and I suppose tile bed slope) is not easy for everyone. (I've never used that plastic guage thing)

It sure is not easy for me.... and I have to sweat and Phuck and Phuck with it.... I think it's an art and as a GC with a belt on, I've only probably done a dozen in my life.... when it's too small inconvenient to sub out.... but even when I sub it, it's not done that well.

I draw or sometimes put a temp ledger on my walls that has been exactly measured out for slope.... I pack my perimeter first.... I think of my planes as they are to run to the drain, I have different size (non square pan) straightedges/screed boards to try and flatten my planes.

I just find it very difficult.... on the preslope, after its set, I test it and will still have some light puddles...

So... Do you guys have any tips as to actually forming my pre-slope and tile beds more perfectly sloped!!!

TIA


Peter
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
This forum really has proven to be quite useful. I've learned a lot from reading here well before I started posting.

Plumber stopped by to redo the drain. Just got back from the tile shop with the quick pitch kit. Gonna give it a go on Monday
 

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If you want to make the slope real easy check out " pro-slope " from Noble Company. They also have Videos for how do do the liner,drains ect.
 

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Inside corners? You shouldn't need to cut any inside corners. They get "pig's ear or pig's fold". That material can be squeezed into a gap between the corner studs. Or just take a chisel and remove enough of the stud to fold the liner flat against the stud and even with its surface. Done this way,you won't need any shims.

You'll need two outside corners for a threshold + the glue.

When doing your preslope the wall plate will be exposed. Figure how much your slope is (1/4" per foot) and add it to the thickness at the drain. That's your total height. Mark that measurement against the wall plate. Using the wall plate as a guide maintain that height all the way around the shower perimeter. Fill in toward the drain shaping a slope in the preslope material.
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
So I have it a go. I packed the pre slope the other day. I ended up doing 2 layers of 3/4 ply to stiffen it up after opening the floor to replace the drain. I laid down a skim coat of polymer modified thinset to prevent moisture being drawn out of the mix. Screeding the mix was definetely harder than it looks! I took my time and got it nice and flat though. I tested it overnight yesterday, and it holds water. Pulled the plug today and it drains nicely with no pooling. Gonna go back tomorrow to the next layer.
 

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Hair Splitter
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So I have it a go. I packed the pre slope the other day. I ended up doing 2 layers of 3/4 ply to stiffen it up after opening the floor to replace the drain. I laid down a skim coat of polymer modified thinset to prevent moisture being drawn out of the mix. Screeding the mix was definetely harder than it looks! I took my time and got it nice and flat though. I tested it overnight yesterday, and it holds water. Pulled the plug today and it drains nicely with no pooling. Gonna go back tomorrow to the next layer.
I lay a sheet of 15# felt on the subfloor for a slip sheet and it also serves to keep the subfloor from drawing moisture out of the mix.

Are you saying your preslope was flat, as in level?
 

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Pan liners sitting flat on the subfloor is the normal and accepted way of building tile showers in my area (south western ontario). I've ripped out well over a hundred showers built this way and they are all the same.... All of them were wet, saturated with mould, and smelled bad!
To the OP, I applaud you for learning the correct way.
I have been fighting this type of install for years. I stopped bidding jobs for new home construction because builders don't care.
 
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