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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was at a customers today and while I was there....
There is a very high pitch almost whistle when the water is diverted from the tub to the shower head. It stops if you put the diverta back to tub.
The customer told me that a plumber looked at it and said the noise was at the diverta. I removed the spout, cleaned and put a little o-ring grease on the diverta and reinstalled it. No more noise ????
Everything did look ok. I just added the grease to smooth the action of the diverta.
Anyone ever come across this before and if so what was it?
Thanks
Bill T
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Huggy
Do you know what causes the noise? It sounds like it is coming from the shower body but greasing the spout did stop the noise. They have not called me to say the noise is back. Do you think I should still replace the spout?
Bill T
 

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Fairly common issue. Especially with hard water deposits.

When the diverter is pulled it creates a suction ( that's how the diverter stays up while water is running, but should release automatically when the water stops). The hard water deposits keep the seal from being tight creating a "gap" where air is pulled through. That air is a true "whistle."
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Remedy1
That is interesting but I always that that the water pressure against the diverta was what kept it up, causing the water to flow to the area of least resistance, and when that water pressure was stopped than it fell. I thought that was why no diverta fully stopped the spout flow. If it did than the diverta would not release as there would always be water pressure against it. After the water dribbles out and the water pressure is finally released than the diverta falls.
Bill T
 

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Essentially we are saying the same thing. The water passing the diverter is causing a change in pressure (i.e. a suction). As soon as that pressure is equalized, the diverter drops. Back to the original whistle - air is getting pulled up through the diverter (gap in the seal) because of the suction/pressure passing the diverter.
 
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