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General Contractor
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Discussion Starter #1
Does anyone know if someone makes a flushvalve toilet that is shorter than 13" from the johnny bolts to the front rim?
 

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Sounds like a door problem?

Not real sure, but I think they have one smaller that they used to call a "Trailer" toilet.

Look and operates the same as regular water closet, however its a little shorter from the bolts to the front.

Good Luck
BJD
 

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DGR,IABD
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Is this one of those old house bathrooms where you can sit on the crapper and wash your hands in the sink at the same time? :)
 

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Discussion Starter #5
The problem is quite difficult to explain.
Its presently roughed in at 16" and can not be moved closer because of I beams in the floor.
There is an 8" wall sink installed right against a shower stall and can not be moved any further forward.
So, we are left with a Gerber 25-644 and your right shoulder on top of the sink when you sit.
Typical NYC maids bath 30" wide by 48" long ( not including the shower stall).
Even with 11' ceilings, the co-op will not let us raise the floor in order to relocate the lead band.
 

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DGR,IABD
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JohnV said:
Even with 11' ceilings, the co-op will not let us raise the floor in order to relocate the lead band.
John, not to hijack this thread, but I'm interested in learning a little more about doing work that involves co-ops. Do you actually work FOR the buliding's co-op, or are they just another rule making body who's "codes" you must also abide by? Curious.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
The bottom line is, each co-op sets up there own rules to meet their needs that the board makes.
Most boards have some architects/designers on them and they mix up building code with the needs of the shareholders.
Many of the co-ops I work in are filled with writers and work at home executives, so, sound prooofing and workhours with chipping hammers are restricted.
Water is a serious concern for them as these buildings are like old submarines (always leaking). Therefore, when you submit a plan for raising a floor to accomdate moving a lead band, they say you can not do it because of the risk factor in adding length to existing piping. Code is of no concern to them.
I know that there is a little more politics going on here than usual. There are two architects on this board. One I know well. He obviouslly knows there is nothing wrong with adding a few inches to lead band and was willing to approve the work. However, there is another board member(ex-construction manager) who refused to give his approval. Apparentlly, the two have been fighting over other issues including there own apartments.
It realy sucks when people get personal crap involved with others.
 

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John, I can sypathize. I have to work with the 'condo commando's' all of the time.....way too much BS.
Here, condo fees are perfectly acceptable. They allow for the short hours and the overall pain in the seat of working at these places.
 

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DGR,IABD
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If they won't let you change out the lead bend for a more traditional layout, would they let you ruff for a wall hung crapper like is used in many commercial bathrooms? Maybe that cannot be accomodated... just offering that into the mix.
 

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General Contractor
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Discussion Starter #12
I considered that also, but the co-op said no because its in front of an exterior wall. They are afraid of freezing.
 
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