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Is it good building practice, bad or irrelevant when replacing a roof to have the shingles roof top delivered and stored along the peak before installation? Since so many roofs are being replaced in my hood, I have seen both practices and wondered if their was a good or bad side to it.
 

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90% of the time we have the shingles ground delivered and we lift them to the roof with a ladder hoist. It doesnt take that much time and everything is out of the way when we are tearing off.

In some situations, for what ever reason, we have the materials delivered onto the roof. I would dare to speculate that at the peak of the roof is where the framing is the strongest. If the shingles are evenly spaced I don't forsee a problem. I would never stack more than 3 bundles high in any spot. That's ALOT of weight. I'd seen full pallets (8 squares) stacked in one spot on a roof as I drive bye and I laugh.
 

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We tear-off, dry-in and then have the shingles rooftop delivered. Spreadout along the ridge, max 3high with a toe bundle on a 2x4. In heavy snow country, our framing can take the load....at least never had a problem...yet????
We never rooftop deliver if the old shingles are still on.
Jim
 

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I'm not a roofer but work in a lot of new developments and rooftop delivery is the norm. Our roofing codes are pretty stringent for two reasons, first is to keep the roof on the house, second is that tile is a popular option (they dont blow off as easily).
 

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Jmorgan, not to go off subject but I prefer to only tear off as much as I can roof that day and I never NEVER leave only felt on a roof. I hate that. My shingle crew is also my tear off crew. They tear off half the roof and roof it then tear off the other half and roof that. I also prefer if the shingles are there waiting for my guys because the suppliers are never on time and I don't want to pay 6 guys to stand around. To each his own I guess.
 

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Grumpy, here we have a dry in inspection and you pretty much have to leave the felt exposed or wait on an inspector for each phase of the job.
 

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I have roof top delivery for every roof except a small multi layer steep tear off every now and then.

One of my builders loads the roofs but stacks them like dominoes, hard to grab shingles since I have to bend over for every bundle.

The other builder I load so I usually make three stacks for a 30-35 sq house.

I've seen some framers and roofers load 16+ sq's on one pile, and never seen a failed truss. However, I've heard of stories.

On tear offs I always make smaller piles since the roof is at least 20 years old up to 100 years old and who knows how strong everything is.
 

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Teetor I have a few cities in my area like that and I refuse to work there or I figure a few hours into my bid for my crew to stand around. It's a total waste of time and it goes against how we do things, safely. Forcing us to tear off an entire roof on a two day job is very unsafe, and who takes the risk? Me, not the building dept. Unfortunately scum bag so called roofers give real roofers like me a hard time earning a living. Nobody has to tell me to replace rotten wood or install ice shield. I want to do it so my roof will last and I don't have any call backs.

Mike I think that is the general agreement.
 

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I understand the gripe Grumpy, I'm just telling you the way that it is.
It took me two weeks to replace a 4 X 30 ft strip for a friend (concrete tile).
BTW, I just said that I don't do roofing not that I don't know how to do it. The section that I replaced was done with PT ply, nailed 4-5" perimeter and 8" in field with SS ring nails, code is 6 and 12. I wasn't taking any chances. The rest of the roof was finished in similar fashion.
 

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In most counties and cities that I work in doing tear offs a bunch of pictures will work for the final inspection.

Unfortunately scum bag so called roofers give real roofers like me a hard time earning a living.

Grumpy, are you roofing again? I see posts here and there saying your a "roofer" I thought you laid down the claw hammer and pitch fork for a sales job?
Me think the Mexicans are the "scum roofers".
 

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Dougger, you can get away with pictures? In other words, all you have to do is one job right and submit the same pictures for every job.
If I was a scammer and could deal with the cold I'd be in MN in a second.
As it is , I pose no threat. I do only first class work and get weird when the temperature drops below 75. I can deal with some snow if I'm hunting but never if I'm working.
 

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Dougger, you can get away with pictures? In other words, all you have to do is one job right and submit the same pictures for every job.

Actually I take before and after pictures making sure to include the house address in every roll of film also. It would look funny to give the inspector pictures of a gable roof job on a hip roof job. Every roof I do is different and could never get away with useing the same pictures twice.

If I was a scammer and could deal with the cold I'd be in MN in a second.

A "scammer" what does that mean? So if you roof in MN your a scammer? OK! I give fair prices and my two builders love my work. I usually bid my tear offs lower than the competion due to very low overhead too.

As it is , I pose no threat. I do only first class work and get weird when the temperature drops below 75. I can deal with some snow if I'm hunting but never if I'm working.

So if your in MN today you wouldn't be able to work? As I speak the temp is below 60 which in my opinion is the best roofing weather. Who wants to be on a roof in MN when it's 90 and humid? Last winter my builder was building a house for her son in law. When the temp dropped to -15 she finally said it's getting a little to cold to work. When it was 0 there was no excuse for me to be on the ground! Last winter when I was ice fishing up north the wind chill dropped to -50, now that's cold.

I doubt your the only roofer doing "first class work", actually my father who's a 30 year roofing installer does excellent work on every roof he does. I was trained by the best 10 years ago and his quality was carried over quite nicely. Sometimes I'll havy my brother help me who was trained by our Uncle, on every job I find myself ripping up shingles here and there.

The fact is there's way to many lousy roofing contractors in every area. I see lots of contractors hireing to the Mex who usually don't have more than a couple years experiance. What's worse is when you get 5 roofing installers on one roof you run into problems since every roofer has his own way of doing things. But, as it stands the worst quality I've seen has come from the white folk! Just a few days ago I had a Mex with insurance call me with prices for his 8 and 7 man crew. He told me the prices which are good but I'm reluctant to hire to Mex. 90% of my tear offs come from high refferals who want me to do the work, not a crew of illegal imigrants.
 

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Douger on another forum I explained in great detail. You don't have to be a roofing installer to be a roofer. Roofer is a generic term to me. Is not the salesman a roofer? Yes he needs excellent roofing knowledge or he will sell himself out of business. Is not the owner of the company a roofer? He sure is! He is the cheif roofer. There are various degrees and aspects of "roofer".

We have many mexicans working for us, not to mention europeans. They are not scum bags. A scum bag is someone who is not honest. Perhaps no insurance. Perhaps no license. Perhaps no training. Perhaps doesn't pull permits. This is a scum bag. Just because you are mexican or a foreigner doesn't make you a scum bag... After all we are all foreigners unless we are native, and only the Indians are really native.
 

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So Gumpy, I can call my brother in law who sold roofs for two summers a roofer? He did help me roof his Dads lake home but he's no roofer, he was more of a salesman selling roofs.

I see lots of people out there calling themselves roofers that don't know squat. They have done a few roofs and think they know what there doing.

Once you roof lets say 100 homes you can get a good feel for roofing and in that time frame you will incounter most situations.
 

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I feel roofer is a name that can be given to anyone who knows roofs, and works in the roofing process. Sales is part of the roofing process, as are installing, supervision etc. Is not someone who estimates a roof a roofer? The estimator needs good knolwledge of how the roof works or will end up estimating the company out of business.

I can also honestly say I have personally roofed less than 100 homes. I'm still a roofer because I have been on every roof I have sold and didn't swing a hammer on any of those 1000 roofs. I'd dare to say my level of knowledge isn't the best but is much much greater than most so called roofers I have spoken with at the supply houses, or even on various forums. You don't have to bust your ass to be a roofer.

I'm not going to argue about this but if you think you have to swing the hammer to be a roofer then that's really sad. If you haven't noticed I am personally defending myself. I do agree with you that there is a certian level of knowledge required but there are various means of obtaining that knlwledge. I will also agree that if you don't have that knowledge you can't call yourself a roofer.
 

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OK, so if a guy sells siding and roofing for a roofing and siding company he's a roofer/sider? Or could he be a roofer selling siding or vise versa?

I personaly consider many various types of "roofers" out there, salesman, sub contractors, contractors, and laborers (the roofers).

For example, if I decided one day to start subbing out all my work I would consider myself a roofing contractor and not a roofer. Or if I decided to just sell roofs I'd consider myself a roofing salesman and not a roofer.

Most people I run into who work on roofs everyday call themselfs roofers while the guys who do the other facets in the roofing industry don't call themself roofers. As my brother in law used to put it, "I sell roofs".

Grumpy, I bet if you asked 100 people who own and operate roofing businesses who stricly hire out and spend no time around job sites if there were roofers they'd say, No.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Jeeze, this makes me
a framer, an electrician, a plumber, a drywaller, a taper, a painter, a cabinet maker, a trim carpenter, a deck builder, a landscaper, a designer, a salesman, a draftsman, a contractor and a laborer. (Everything but a roofer!)

I'm gonna need a bigger business card!
 

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Getting back to the original thread, I just saw a widget that's new to me. It fits over a wall and holds a whole pallet of sheathing.
I have never paid much attention to roofing but because of this site I have started. These guys store everything up there, felt, sealer, sheathing, tile, virtually everything. Some seal the felt seams, some don't. Saw some green underlay on one roof, seams sealed, looked good.
I don't know all of the differences now but I will as my roof is in for a redo and I want the latest in tiedowns and underlays. Topside, I'm going Heavy Metal.
 
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