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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So how many of you guys are now recycling shingles instead of dumping?

My partners have all left me in the installation business and migrated to grinding. They love it, no lowballers, no adjusters, no homeowners and since the start up cost is so great, no competition to speak of!

Planned on grinding at the Indiana location and so far the new machine hasnt made it out of Michigan, everyone keeps needing shingles ground....these guys are working on a pile in Detroit right now that may take months to finish.....

Seems like the recycling just keeps ramping up.
 

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Hmmm never really heard of it. I know of anew companies who said they were trying to recycle but said it was hard to find anyone. Is everything just put in one pile and ran through a grinder or does it first have to be separated?
 

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I would be interested in any info you have as to what and how these guys are going about.

I did a very large apartment complex in 1997 and 1998. All tolled it was about 9000 squares of 2 layer tear off.

I made an agreement with a local company to have the material hauled for recycling. The deal was to cost me $5/ton plus trucking. I was working with dumpsters pulled by semis so I could load upward of 22 tons per box @ $200 a pull. It was peanuts compared to the then price of close to $40/ton to the transfer station.

Well they hauled about 1/2 the job and got shut down by the NYSDEC or something. Rumors were that Waste Management was pressuring the powers that be, claiming they were a disposal company or land fill operating without the proper regulatory authorization :blink: and not a recycling concern.

Waste's beef was supposedly about removing part of the waste stream, which they wanted.

Anyway, I would love to know what's going on in this arena.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
You separate the trash from shingles and put all asphalt products in pile. You then run it thru a Rotochopper by using a loader....the chopper will pull all metal out into one pile and ground asphalt comes out the other..........you then truck the grinds to the asphalt plant.

We have places in Indiana who accept shingles for recycling and allow you to dump for discount if clean shingles......these companies then hire in a chopper once the pile is large enough. There are very few choppers in the US.

Mr. Latone, We went thru all kinds of problems with IDEM over air quality permits and then zoning over the parking lot that was asphalt. You then have to test loads for asbestos. Indiana wanted us to put in a concrete lot instead of asphalt that was existing...they wanted concrete where asphalt was to be dumped on, but they came around. Our guys are working in Michigan right now for a company who does just what you said. They provide dumpsters for large jobs then stockpile the material until it is a large pile, then they contract the chopping and then they sell the grinds to asphalt companies for incorporating into roads. The thing is, some states like Illinois mandate 10% recycled useage in roads, where other states like Indiana don't MANDATE it, but they allow it. Expect Indiana to mandate within coming years.

Waste Management is big around here as well....in fact we have a huge landfill in my town. They have always been known to strongarm local politicians. Waste Management don't like shingle recyclers because it takes big weight from them.
 

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You separate the trash from shingles and put all asphalt products in pile. You then run it thru a Rotochopper by using a loader....the chopper will pull all metal out into one pile and ground asphalt comes out the other..........you then truck the grinds to the asphalt plant.

We have places in Indiana who accept shingles for recycling and allow you to dump for discount if clean shingles......these companies then hire in a chopper once the pile is large enough. There are very few choppers in the US.
The pile of shingles was the demise of these guys I mentioned. They would stock pile until the colder months (supposedly). I guess the pile got big enough to cause a stir.

The company I was dealing with had a cold patch they were to be making from the roofing. Too bad the guys in the company didn't have very good business sense.

So this rotochopper is portable or stationary?

Ground up shingles need to be treated to make binder or whatever. The plants to do that need to be in place as well. i don't know of any in my area.

It's a great idea and should be happening everywhere. Too bad it's most likely regulatory bureaucracy keeping it down.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Chopper machine is portable.

I am not sure how they refine and supply it, but I do know as more states mandate it be used, the demand will be increased. A railroad spur nearby would be helpful.
 

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Their aren't any sites near me that recycle. There was one a few years ago about 30 miles away, didn't seem to catch on. I'm in IL and have 3 acres just outside of town that's doing nothing...

So you guys are running two rates? One for wrappers, wood, & shingles, and one for just shingles? It seems like it would be a PITA to dig wrappers/trash out of 60sq of shingles.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Around here you have to separate bags from shingles...we make our crews put bags in large trash bags then we throw them out separate when we dump shingles or else in our dumpster at shop.

If you dump clean shingles with no trash it is around $10 a ton, if it has trash it is then $42 per ton and dumps as trash instead of recycle shingles. We have MRF's(Material Recovery Facility)around here as well...they will take trash in shingles at 42 per ton........but they then transfer it to a conveyer where hourly people stand and sort the trash before it goes to grinders and compactors. They recycle metals, glass, plastic, cardboard and asphalt.

It's not as easy as I make it sound, but if you can get the permits to store it and you have an asphalt plant that will purchase and a large building to keep finished product dry.....you can always subcontract your chopping. Just a thought.

I will try getting some more solid numbers on what a guy can make doing this. I don't know for sure what an asphalt plant pays for the grinds. Stay tuned.
 

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So I looked at rotochopper on the interwebs. The site has basic information about their machines.

They lay out a basic and very optimistic operation cost/income analysis.

The optimistic part is the idea that the operation runs continuously at full capacity.

I suppose as a start-up, the simplest way to go would be to be the subcontractor who has the machine and does the grinding. Kind of like a harvester who goes from farm to farm with harvesting equipment.

The entire concept is long over due and there is definitely opportunity for the right businesses to succeed It should be a win at every level.
 

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.......I don't know for sure what an asphalt plant pays for the grinds. Stay tuned.
I am sure municipal. state and federal mix requirements are much stricter than that of parking lots and driveways.

I wonder how the mixing plants handle this?

I would imagine it's difficult to 'grade' the recycled content. Does recycled roofing make it into anything public? Demand is the driving force behind everything.
 

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I am sure municipal. state and federal mix requirements are much stricter than that of parking lots and driveways.

I wonder how the mixing plants handle this?

I would imagine it's difficult to 'grade' the recycled content. Does recycled roofing make it into anything public? Demand is the driving force behind everything.
Asphalt plants work by weights. The asphalt mix they are making at any one time has certain mix requirement.s This includes the amount of recycled material that can be in that certain mix. The mix once through the mixing and heating process goes into a silo which dumps into trucks.

Shingles dont seem to have a popular following here for recycling. This may have something to do with the fact that the MDOT mixes keep getting changed. MDOT only allows a certain % of recycled material. As of right now, that % is usually made up of millings from road projects. As it is, these plants have a hard time using up those millings after they are crushed.

As for using the mix on private/commercial projects that is just as hard. Any project being done with an engineer usually specs use of an MDOT designed mix.
 

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Asphalt plants work by weights. The asphalt mix they are making at any one time has certain mix requirement.s This includes the amount of recycled material that can be in that certain mix. The mix once through the mixing and heating process goes into a silo which dumps into trucks.

Shingles dont seem to have a popular following here for recycling. This may have something to do with the fact that the MDOT mixes keep getting changed. MDOT only allows a certain % of recycled material. As of right now, that % is usually made up of millings from road projects. As it is, these plants have a hard time using up those millings after they are crushed.

As for using the mix on private/commercial projects that is just as hard. Any project being done with an engineer usually specs use of an MDOT designed mix.
That's kind of what I was getting at,

The sad part here is that the asphalt content in recycled shingles is likely between 3 and 6 times higher than millings. Without a way to determine this, the value and subsequent usefulness of the roofing is compromised; perhaps to a point where the material surplus becomes excessive.

If millings are asphalt and aggregate, the weight ratio is significantly different than the weight ratio of asphalt and 'other' in shingles.

I would suggest that the logistics in efficient shingle recycling are a lot more involved than those of millings. I don't know where the industry is on this.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
JDavis, That is odd because the biggest piles right now are in Michigan, Lansing and Detroit. I can tell you this, right as we speak.......lobbyists are working on making it law in Indiana that mandate our roads have 5% recycled, like Illinois now has.......maybe Michigan is on that same path. Buy the rumor, sell the news.
 

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I would be interested in any info you have as to what and how these guys are going about.

I did a very large apartment complex in 1997 and 1998. All tolled it was about 9000 squares of 2 layer tear off.

I made an agreement with a local company to have the material hauled for recycling. The deal was to cost me $5/ton plus trucking. I was working with dumpsters pulled by semis so I could load upward of 22 tons per box @ $200 a pull. It was peanuts compared to the then price of close to $40/ton to the transfer station.

Well they hauled about 1/2 the job and got shut down by the NYSDEC or something. Rumors were that Waste Management was pressuring the powers that be, claiming they were a disposal company or land fill operating without the proper regulatory authorization :blink: and not a recycling concern.

Waste's beef was supposedly about removing part of the waste stream, which they wanted.

Anyway, I would love to know what's going on in this arena.
9000 sq :eek:
 

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Yeah, but it was all 4:12. Most of the buildings were approx 25' rafter x 100' long. Up and over. 180 buildings (apartment complex)

It was a lot of work, but went quite well.

I would take as many like that as I could get.
 

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Yeah, but it was all 4:12. Most of the buildings were approx 25' rafter x 100' long. Up and over. 180 buildings (apartment complex)

It was a lot of work, but went quite well.

I would take as many like that as I could get.
Thats crazy, any pics? Thats some serious volume :thumbup:
 

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NOT recycling shingles is frustrating and expensive. For now I don't have a choice

I did a job in 2012 that was a little over 3K squares. Two layer T.O. No shingles recycled from that job. That's a real shame.
My math says 3K x 2 layers x 225lbs divided by 2000 = 675 tons

I was not responsible for the disposal, but @ $50/ton that would be $33750 plus hauling. You can't get around the hauling either way.

If a grinder/recycler came into the picture and the tonnage cost could have been cut to $10, that would be $27K less on disposal.

On top of that, the reclamation process should show a positive cash result.

Thats crazy, any pics? Thats some serious volume :thumbup:
This was typical, but it's just a copy paste from their website. The work was in two phases, 1997 and 1998. It was before digital pics were commonplace. I may have some prints somewhere.

Property Home House Building Real estate

Individually the units were not very interesting.
 
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