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Ive been working around a few crews for the last few weeks who sheet all their walls on the ground prior to standing. They swear its faster and easier to get a plumb wall this way and for the most part their work is clean. Ive alway stood my walls and plumbed and lined before i sheated. Personally i think its more accurate to plumb with a plate level than square a wall with a tape. Opinions anyone?
 

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roofcutter said:
Ive been working around a few crews for the last few weeks who sheet all their walls on the ground prior to standing. They swear its faster and easier to get a plumb wall this way and for the most part their work is clean. Ive alway stood my walls and plumbed and lined before i sheated. Personally i think its more accurate to plumb with a plate level than square a wall with a tape. Opinions anyone?
For me, the time savings of sheathing on the ground, when possible, outweighs the slight accuracy bump of plumbing them in place, especially above the first floor.
 

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I know i searched it right after i posted. I guess we all got the right to a dumb move every once in a while. :oops:
I always sheet on the ground unless it's an addition or something where I've got a goofy connection point.

BTW, it's easier to sheet, rigid foam, housewrap on the ground.
 

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As long as your floor deck is level, (within 3/16" over 20') it's easier to square and sheat walls on the ground.

We even tyvek on the ground.

Way easier to stand up a square wall, than it is to square it off of ladders.

Way less set up and break down time than sheating and house wrap off ladders and stages. Save that for the siding and fascia.

Anyone who has spent time on a production framing crew, (at least that I know) stands the sheated wall.

That technique tends to stick long after you've moved on to remodeling and trim carpentry.

- Scott
 

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I've always sheathed walls on the floor. But the last time I did it was the last time I ever framed.

I was laid off from my real job for a few winter months, so I went to work for a guy building condo's in Park City. I nailed mine off and I cut out the window hole. The piece didn't drop out, so I walked out on it and gave it a big ol' stomp...

...on my way to the basement floor, I remembered that I had just cut out the stairwell window, and there weren't no stairs yet! I hit flat on my back, breaking several vertibrays(sp?). At the local clinic, they found blood in my urine, so off to Salt Lake in an ambulance (my only ambulance ride, so far) At the hospital, I discovered that this low-life SOB that I worked for didn't have a scrap of insurance. No worker's comp, no liability, no nuthin'. I found this out when the hospital threw me out. I wasn't gonna die, so that ended their involvement with me.

That was 25 years ago and I live every day in considerable pain.

My point is-be careful when cutting out windows:blink:
 

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pritch said:
I've always sheathed walls on the floor. But the last time I did it was the last time I ever framed. I was laid off from my real job for a few winter months, so I went to work for a guy building condo's in Park City. I nailed mine off and I cut out the window hole. The piece didn't drop out, so I walked out on it and gave it a big ol' stomp... ...on my way to the basement floor, I remembered that I had just cut out the stairwell window, and there weren't no stairs yet! I hit flat on my back, breaking several vertibrays(sp?). At the local clinic, they found blood in my urine, so off to Salt Lake in an ambulance (my only ambulance ride, so far) At the hospital, I discovered that this low-life SOB that I worked for didn't have a scrap of insurance. No worker's comp, no liability, no nuthin'. I found this out when the hospital threw me out. I wasn't gonna die, so that ended their involvement with me. That was 25 years ago and I live every day in considerable pain. My point is-be careful when cutting out windows:blink:
Or don't cut out the basement opening until walls are up.

But that sucks man. I would always ***** when my old boss would make me build railings around openings like that. I understand now that I have my own crew.
 

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I have sheathed walls after they are up for many years. On the coast, sheathing is required to lap the box and tie floors together. All seams are blocked as well. I find it easier after they are standing. Anyone who suffers from back spasms migjt relate.
 

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I sheet on the ground as much as possible.

Tyvek, facia, even soffit sometimes.

Chit is side the whole thing on the ground if I could.


I've seen houses sided on the ground..... I sheet and tyvec on the ground, but I don't ever think I'll side on the ground. I've seen vinyl and hardie plank installed on walls lying down.
 

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I have a small crew and do all the sheeting on the ground as long as we can pick it up and set it.For long ,heavy walls I at least put a sheet in each corner and square it.
 

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we stand our walls up and sheet after plumb. once the walls are up and plumb you can have 2 guys rolling ceiling beams/floor joists while 2 other guys are filling in nailers and blocking and 2 other guys are sheeting the walls.
 
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