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I have a few tricks I use that I've not seen anyone else use. Not to say I invented them but the few little tricks I have I did make up on my own as I'm sure many of you have too.

First tip: If I'm running trim up a stairway this is how I get my Miter angle to make the trimwork match perfectly without math. This works with any angle.

I use a simple hand held angle finder and lay it on the ground and mark the ground (In pencil or chalk) Garage floor or driveway. I lay the 2 boards along each angle so they overlap on the top and bottom. I mark them both where they cross at A & B then set my Mitre saw up with the angle marked on the board(s) and cut them getting an exact cut every time.



Second tip: When cutting trim I'll use a scribe mark whenever it's possible instead of measuring.

MZ-HANDYMAN
Whats your tip/trick
 

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Superior Firepower
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5,089 Posts
When trimming doors, mark the line with a
utility knife and straight edge, then
cut outside the line and
sand a little to finish.
:thumbsup:

 

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Sawdust Sweeper
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I'll give ya a twofer, these are not original to me and maybe everyone does it this way, I don't know...

1. When setting doors, always use the door as point of reference! Plum the door both directions and then shim the jamb to the appropriate reveals.

2. In the pursuit of this I use 3 1/8 grk climatek coated trim head composite deck screws. They have a reverse thread at the top and you can screw them in and then reverse them to bring the jam in and out as necessary. (Works great for P.G., I don't use them with stain grade.
 

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strat hd
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Hard to explain but I bend a nail to make it travel in a different direction before setting and driving. Comes in handy when nailing walls together in a bay situation. 45 degree walls.
 

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I have a few tricks I use that I've not seen anyone else use. Not to say I invented them but the few little tricks I have I did make up on my own as I'm sure many of you have too.

First tip: If I'm running trim up a stairway this is how I get my Miter angle to make the trimwork match perfectly without math. This works with any angle.

I use a simple hand held angle finder and lay it on the ground and mark the ground (In pencil or chalk) Garage floor or driveway. I lay the 2 boards along each angle so they overlap on the top and bottom. I mark them both where they cross at A & B then set my Mitre saw up with the angle marked on the board(s) and cut them getting an exact cut every time.



Second tip: When cutting trim I'll use a scribe mark whenever it's possible instead of measuring.

MZ-HANDYMAN
Whats your tip/trick
That first tip seems like a PITA ,most trim carpenters can look at a set of stairs and tell you the angles off the top of their head, once you find one angle the rest is a given .
Everyone has some tricks they use that work for them and not necessarily good for the next guy . Most are time proven ,like scribing .
I'm not tying to bust your azz ,tricks of a trade are a normal thing caused by a need to do things faster and to cut down on waste and repetitive movements.
 

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After you fire that trim nail in to your board and the head is still sticking out, forget the nail punch. Take the nails out of the trim gun and center the firing pin over the nail and pull the trigger. Sets the nail easily.
 

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Tech Geek
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If you want to tack a board in and don't have any hand drivers on you, shoot through the fat part of a cedar shim then pull it off. The nail will be sticking out far enough that you can still pull it when finished.
 

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Has anyone had to put new locksets on a door that was drilled much smaller than the 2 1/8" required for the new hardware? I take a short piece of 1x4 and drill a 2 1/8" hole in it, and then clamp this to the door centered over the existing hole, now I have a template for my 2 1/8" hole saw to follow.
 

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Maker of Fine Sawdust
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Wonder Bars/flat bars are a great help when installing a door. If it is a very heavy door you can use it as a fulcrum lift to get it into place. If you are drilling the bore holes you can put one on either side of the door to lock it in place so it doesn't swing while you are drilling. You can put one at the end of the door (on the floor) so that when you pull the last screw out of the last hinge it doesn't drop.
 

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When hanging a replacement door, try using a story pole to mark were the hinges go, beats the heck out of a tape measure.
 

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Your framing hammer measures about 16".

Your regular hammer measures about 13".

A dollar bill measures about 6".
 

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Cabinetmaker
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RickS; They have an arbor setup I think "oops" really where you put on a holesaw the size of the smaller hole, and then the bigger one for the size you need. You get a pilot and nod need for templates etc.
 
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