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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hey all, I'm in need of a shallow anchoring method for plaster over concrete ceilings to hang curtain rods. This is a luxury high-rise condo in San Francisco with tons of restrictions/requirements. Here goes.

approx. 25 anchors
screws no bigger then a #10 or 3/16 diameter.
I can't drill any deeper than 1".
No expansion fasteners
No Tapcon screws, because the shortest are 1 1/4"

Basically, limiting me to drill and epoxy or powder actuated fasteners?

If I use drill and epoxy I need a product that sets up fast and works for interior, overhead application. I would like to set all fasteners in the morning, take lunch and come back to hang the rods in the afternoon. Is there anything that sets up within 1-2 hours.
Powder actuated seems like it would go faster, but it seems pretty permanent and I've never used them before, so I'm a little gun-shy (pun intended). I guess I could do some test shot to get feel for it.

Fresh ideas appreciated.
 

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Drill the 1" holes (MASONRY BIT!) and stuff them with wood or soft plastic then screw in your screws. Plastic from 5 Gallon bucket tops is strong and soft. slide in 2 long thin pieces and run the screw between them.

I've been using this method for years on brick, I tend to stick to plastic for exterior mounting due to the wood eventually giving out.

MZ-HANDYMAN
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Sounds like it might work but wouldn't that be considered an expansion fastener? I don't want to take any chances seeing as how I would be agreeing to very specific terms by very rich lawyers. Maybe I could dip the strips in epoxy first, then insert them into the hole. The screw/bracket would hold weight immediately and the screws would be epoxied.
 

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Sounds like it might work but wouldn't that be considered an expansion fastener? I don't want to take any chances seeing as how I would be agreeing to very specific terms by very rich lawyers. Maybe I could dip the strips in epoxy first, then insert them into the hole. The screw/bracket would hold weight immediately and the screws would be epoxied.
You could drill the holes a hair smaller than your tapcons use no plastic or epoxy and there would be less chance of cracking. You may need to add a 1/4" sleve to acommodate the oversized screw(s)

Here is a link to a TAPCON video but I had no sound when it played.
http://www.concretefasteners.com/anchors-fasteners/tapcon-screw/installation.aspx

Another option would be to make some 1 1/4" allthread plugs and epoxy them into the 1" holes and attach the curtain rods with washers and nuts.

If they are being that specific, do they at least offer suggestions for anchors in their rules?

Looks like you may have to go and epoxy the anchors/hangers one day and the rods the next.

MZ-HANDYMAN
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I just reviewed the contract, they say drill and epoxy method or powder actuated fasteners. That's it.

Anybody know what the fastest setting epoxy is?
 

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The Deck Guy
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Who wrote that spec?

Any PAT is way, way, way more risky than a Tapcon of the same length would ever be. The results of shooting a bad pin can be damaging to the surface in terms of cracking and spalling. A tapcon or even a plastic molly is a safer bet.

The spec makes no sense.

Oh well.
 

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I just reviewed the contract, they say drill and epoxy method or powder actuated fasteners. That's it.

Anybody know what the fastest setting epoxy is?
I use EP=400 Epoxy Putty (Plumbing Dept about $6)

EP400 EPOXY STICK
EP-400 (4 oz.) epoxy putty is a pre-measured kneadable reinforced epoxy putty stick that cures "steel-hard" within 15 to 20 minutes of mixing at room temperature (77 degree F). The epoxy is extremely tough and durable with exceptional adhesion to a wide range of surfaces.

Within an hour, it can be drilled, tapped, sanded, painted, filed or machined. It can be used to bond, seal, plug, mold or rebuild many different surfaces. The epoxy is capable of withstanding temperatures up to 500 degree F and will even harden under water.

I use it for broken wood repair, small concrete patches, plumbing, etc...
where a drain pipe meets stucco and a lot more.

Hope this is what you needed!
 

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Epcon

We usually use the C6 ceramic epoxy from RedHead....sets up rock hard, about 15 20 minutes in avg. temp. That stick epoxy sounds pretty good as well, though I've never used it. Remember to use air to clean your holes....the C6 , when it starts to set, is much like hydraulic cement, as it goes from fairly fluid to rock hard in about 2 minutes when it starts to kick....have your threaded rod in place...gl
 
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