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Official CT Greeter!
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WTF?:eek:

I think juniors goldfish wasn't dead and mutated into that thing...
 

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EVIL GENIUS
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I wonder what the hell people in N Caroloina eat.
 

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Official CT Greeter!
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I wonder if maybe it is some sort of bacteria or fungus or something that is reacting to the sewage that is moving past it causing it to expand and contract?...who knows but that is some fvcked up shiiit...
 

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EVIL GENIUS
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Tubifex tubifex, also called the sludge worm, or sewage worm, is a species of tubificid segmented worm that inhabits the sediments of lakes and rivers on several continents. T. tubifex probably includes several species, but distinguishing between them is difficult because the reproductive organs, commonly used in species identification, are resorbed after mating, and because the external characteristics of the worm vary with changes in salinity. These worms ingest sediments, selectively digest bacteria, and absorb molecules through the body wall.
The worms can survive with little oxygen by waving hemoglobin rich tail-ends to exploit all available oxygen. They can also survive in areas heavily polluted with organic matter that almost no other species can endure. By forming a protective cyst and lowering its metabolic rate, T. tubifex can survive drought and food shortage. Encystment may also function in the dispersal of the worm.



[edit] Uses

Ecologically, the worms are important as a source of food for leeches, crustaceans, insects, and fish. Tubifex are sold as fish-food in both live and freeze-dried, pelletised forms. While the worms are relatively easy to culture, they can take up to a month before they can be harvested. Although they are high in protein, they are not recommended for human consumption due to a high salt content.
 
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