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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I will be installing a new septic system at the local grain elevator soon so the Sanitarian and I met today to look the place over... The separation distances from the well put the secondary treatment field on the opposite side of the road that leads to the scale.... Loaded grain trucks will be crossing this every day at 80K gross weight. Pipe will probably lay about 2-2.5' below road grade. I generally pipe the effluent to the field with SDR-35 pipe but thats when I am messing up someones pristine lawn that never sees more weight than a lawn mower.... Will Schedule 40 be stout enough to take this kind of weight/traffic? If not, what's better? Thanks....
 

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We have done two different things in this situation. We have used schedule 80 pipe or encase the pipe in concrete. We have never had problems with either.:thumbsup:
 

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Don't know what kind of codes, rules, etc. you have there.

But here the pipe has to be sleeved, meaning you double wall it by sliding it through some schedule 40 or 80 with ends sealed around inner pipe or encase in concrete. We have to do this anywhere the pipe will being driven over, even in a residential driveway or a drive to the barn in back of the house.
 

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Around here the engineers like to sleeve the 4" pipe in 6" and then back fill with stone. Nothing like throwing a little money at it :laughing:
 

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If you just need to beef it up under the road than I would go overkill. It isn't going to hurt the situation and for the amount of footage just to get under the road, you aren't talking about a lot of extra expense.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for the replies guys... I think I am going to go a little overkill on this one. My narrowest bucket is 13'' so I will use that to do away with as much soil disturbance as possible and leave less of a ditch for the trucks to drop into..... A couple yards of concrete will go a long ways in a narrow ditch. Part of my reasoning for this is that the same Co-Op has another site that needs a septic system and excavation for an addition, just wanting them to see that I wont cut corners.... Thanks again!
 

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Paul, I think I would sleeve it 4 or 5' beyond the edges of the drive. That way if for what ever reason it needs to be replaced an new section of pipe can be pushed through without disturbing the drive surface.

Encasing in concrete might be good as long as the concrete is not poured to the surface. If the trucks run over the concrete and break it, the shear could bust your pipe. I would make sure I had a soil/stone buffer.

But if you really want to kill it, I would bed the pipe in stone in the 13" trench about 1 foot of cover, cut a 30" wide trench above that, pour 1 foot thick of reinforced concrete, then cover with stone or what ever pavement they are using.
 

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Will Schedule 40 be stout enough to take this kind of weight/traffic? If not, what's better? Thanks....
I like the gasket joints on DR-35 pipe more than the solvent weld joints on SCH 40. They're easier to assemble properly and flexible. At shallow depths, and provided of course the pipe is bedded and backfilled properly, I'd be more concerned about the pipe being able to sustain some movement from freeze/thaw forces than I would anything else. A solvent weld joint is rigid and subject to cracking under stress - unlike an elastomeric gasket.

Also, pouring unreinforced concrete around stuff sometimes has its own issues; namely it tends to transfer loads directly to whatever's beneath/within it. If you have the flexibility to do so I'd say bury the pipe a foot deeper and forego the encasement.
 
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