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The top plate of a four inch wall in the basement that's been mangled from notching for plumbing, which is what is supporting the severed end now
So there is a load path from the midspan beam down to the basement floor, which I assume is concrete? If so, that changes the equation. The simple solution is to put a pier in the basement and a post up to the mid span member. I'd also note that it being 2x material indicates to me that there was or is a continuous wall under it.
 

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Relatively quick solution is to sink a couple of 4*6 posts in the basement or crawl space and run a new double 2*10 beam across them underneath the ends of those floor joists, as close to the wall as you can get it. That will transfer the load of the joists off the wall and plate.

Around my parts an inspector may or may not approve that, but it will get the job done. Obviously you'll want to jack up the joists back to level before you secure the new beam.

Be aware that you stand a 50/50 chance of cracking drywall, tile, or windows in the floor above when you jack those joists back into place. Plan and budget accordingly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
You can’t rename something to suit your desires. A rim joist goes around the rim of the structure. The outside perimeter.
You seem to be trying to explain a center beam. If that the case, and it was cut, you could have a very serious situation. But it could be a plain joist. Without better pictures and/or a sketch, your situation is dang near impossible to discuss.
511385


Turns out it's a built up beam. But it's completely severed resti g on top plates. I'm gonna steel plate all the way across that's the only reasonable solution I can think of
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
So there is a load path from the midspan beam down to the basement floor, which I assume is concrete? If so, that changes the equation. The simple solution is to put a pier in the basement and a post up to the mid span member. I'd also note that it being 2x material indicates to me that there was or is a continuous wall under it.
that's a long story but yes it's basically resting on a wall that's been doubled to fit plumbing but it only has contact on the inner one, which is buried in the wall of a room I refinished downstairs. Here's a better picture
511387
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
Relatively quick solution is to sink a couple of 4*6 posts in the basement or crawl space and run a new double 2*10 beam across them underneath the ends of those floor joists, as close to the wall as you can get it. That will transfer the load of the joists off the wall and plate.

Around my parts an inspector may or may not approve that, but it will get the job done. Obviously you'll want to jack up the joists back to level before you secure the new beam.

Be aware that you stand a 50/50 chance of cracking drywall, tile, or windows in the floor above when you jack those joists back into place. Plan and budget accordingly.
Yea I was trying to avoid ripping up a roo. Just refinished lol what if I run two steel plates and bolt the beams back together
 

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View attachment 511385

Turns out it's a built up beam. But it's completely severed resti g on top plates. I'm gonna steel plate all the way across that's the only reasonable solution I can think of
If there is a wall below I would expect to see the joist resting on the top plate and blocked. If it's a flush beam I would expect to see pressure blocking at the ends of the joist. I'm not seeing any connections at all, but there is clearly something supporting that mess. I also don't see where you would put a steel plate that would be of any use unless you intend to remove the duct and the ABS pipe.
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
If there is a wall below I would expect to see the joist resting on the top plate and blocked. If it's a flush beam I would expect to see pressure blocking at the ends of the joist. I'm not seeing any connections at all, but there is clearly something supporting that mess. I also don't see where you would put a steel plate that would be of any use unless you intend to remove the duct and the ABS pipe.
I removed the duct so I can fit a steel plate I think I got enough room without removing the waste pipe. If I could get a decent pic of the wall below you would see just how little thought was given it's hacked to bits
 

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I removed the duct so I can fit a steel plate I think I got enough room without removing the waste pipe. If I could get a decent pic of the wall below you would see just how little thought was given it's hacked to bits
Are you expecting the steel plate to transfer load across the section that's cut out? If so, you're going to have to open up a whole bunch more floor to get enough bite. Before you do that, I'd check out "latent defect" laws in you're state to see how long you're on the hook for the solution you've come up with.
Patching up an old butcher job that has failed means you assume all of the liability for that repair. If there are future problems because your repair was questionable, you'll pay for it, and you'll pay retail. I'm guessing this work isn't being done under a building permit, which will add to your liability.
Personally, I think you need to do this with a proscriptive method, or have an engineer design the repair.
 

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not really sure what is going on .Regarding patching the beam,you already tore up the floor ,tear up more .fix the beam using 3 sections of 2x stock .lets say 2' ,ten put maybe a 6 and an 8 on the outside .glue ,lots of nails .and by all means sandwhich that steel plate in with lots of bolts .it is called a fitch plate . longer the lengths you can get in the better .
whether i go in deep or throw on a patch really depends on the client /the job .
not under standing this wall underneath thing ,is this beam load bearing ?
 

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Your proposed fix is called "Plating", very common.

However, an engineer must observe the issue to prescribe a fix.

Length, width and thickness of the plating material and fastener type and placement need to be called out.

Not a by guess and by golly situation.
 

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Your proposed fix is called "Plating", very common.

However, an engineer must observe the issue to prescribe a fix.

Length, width and thickness of the plating material and fastener type and placement need to be called out.

Not a by guess and by golly situation.
He could go traditional and stand back with a couple buddy's and a beer and say "looks pretty good to me".
 

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Your proposed fix is called "Plating", very common.

However, an engineer must observe the issue to prescribe a fix.

Length, width and thickness of the plating material and fastener type and placement need to be called out.

Not a by guess and by golly situation.
Yep. It has stood up for probably 60 years. However, as soon as he touches it, it will fail.

Just how it works.

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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
Thanks for the advice I went ahead and put in posts like some of you said along with bolting them back together with steel strapping. I put in 6 4x4s down both walls to shore it up along where the beams were severed. Both walls are taking the load of the built up beams, the outside beams are resting on the top plate of each wall. So I tore out the dry wall and patched in posts and anchored them down through the bottom plates to the slab. I didn't fix the sag but this will certainly keep it from getting worse. I'll attach a couple pictures
511426
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I still got some blocking to do but that's basically my simple fix. Some of the posts are behind all that so you can see them.
 

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Why didn't you take the dip out....all that effort and you half @$$ it?

Also the term was "plating" not "strapping"

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strikes me as a lame repair .unless there is a wall under that beam . still lame though .is there a wall under this beam ???
 
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