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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I went to look at a job to close in a covered back porch on a fairly new house, a block and slab foundation.

The the back porch works out is that the beam going around the top of the porch is actually over the brick roll lock and not the slab. So if I level a wall down from under the beam, the bottom plate will be sitting mostly on the roll lock and maybe a 1/2" on the slab.

Is the roll lock in this situation suitable for supporting a load bearing wall? The bricks go all the way down to the edge of the footer and also I believe that there is a notch in the top of the slab there so part of the roll lock is actually sitting on the slab/block.

I haven't come across this situation yet, seems most jobs has a something this doesn't it?
 

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Thanks Super.....

Just curious... but I would like to understand that assembly....

Best
 

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veneer brick is generally not considered to be part of the load bearing assembly. You might be able to get an inspector to allow it but I wouldn't go ahead until you get approval. What else would the brick sit on except the foundation?
 

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must be like building with lego's
 

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Is a "brick roll lock" what I might know as a "brickledge" cast in a stem wall pour?????

I'm confused what a "brick roll lock" is.... so I don't undersatnd the asembly.
 

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It's "rowlock" not roll lock. Maybe why you're having a hard time. Think of when someone makes a window sill using brick. Those bricks are set in rowlock, the 4x2 1/4" side is out, and the brick is set on edge. It's often used to finish off a brick wall because then the top and bottom of the brick aren't exposed

http://www.google.ca/imgres?imgurl=...a=X&ei=8CiRUrn0HqO62AW7s4H4Cw&ved=0CDcQ9QEwAw

There you learned something
 

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To the OP; In my opinion, without seeing this of course, I would think that it would be OK to set a wall on top of the rowlock. As SS said, the brick should be a structural path to the footing. Now, I don't think I would put a tremendous amount of weight on top of there, but you should be able to put a porch wall on there.

You might want to make sure you get a good anchor of some type where your plate sets on the brick, as typically the rowlocks do not have a full bed of mortar between them. Just my .02
 

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Question: Why is this a loadbearing wall? I thought you were just closing in an existing structure? If the beam already exists, it's being supported by something, put a wall below it and whatever was holding it up still can be counted on to hold it up. By the description you are building an exterior non-loadbearing wall.

Pics or even a drawing/sketch would clear up a lot of confusion (unless you're like one guy i worked for then a sketch would add lots to the confusion)
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks for the replies gentlemen. Sorry about the "roll lock" I guess hearing the term from southern construction workers you never really know what the slang could be.

I don't have a pic, I guess I should have taken one but it didn't cross my mind at the time, I was studying the job and building things in my head.... I generally take several pics when I go look at jobs but this one I didn't for some odd reason.

Thanks for the suggestion about getting a good anchor since there isn't much mortar. I'll be sure and do that.

Its going to be a load bearing wall because the porch comes out from the house and the "outside beam" isn't sitting on an exterior wall. It's connected to two other beams with a post in the corners.
 
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