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Just wanted to let some of you plumbers out there about a new product.
I had a friend of mine go to a PHCC trade show in Orlando last month and he brought back a Set-Rite "Contractor Pack". Apparently this is the only spacer that goes underneath the toilet flange during rough-in. I watched him use these spacers as a layout tool and literally set four (4) toilet flanges in less than an hour. As I was looking at the bag they came in I noticed they have a website at set-rite.com so I went there to check it out. Sure enough it was just like my buddy said ...no more shimming or waiting for the tile guy to finish his floor. He is raving about them and said he was sick of cutting 3/4" plywood spacers...Take a look

Tom
 

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Boy that sounds like an ad (SPAM).

Are you affiliated with this product or why is your first post on this board a commercial?

No offense, but something doesn't smell right.
 

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The Inspector said:
Just wanted to let some of you plumbers out there about a new product.
I had a friend of mine go to a PHCC trade show in Orlando last month and he brought back a Set-Rite "Contractor Pack". Apparently this is the only spacer that goes underneath the toilet flange during rough-in. I watched him use these spacers as a layout tool and literally set four (4) toilet flanges in less than an hour. As I was looking at the bag they came in I noticed they have a website at set-rite.com so I went there to check it out. Sure enough it was just like my buddy said ...no more shimming or waiting for the tile guy to finish his floor. He is raving about them and said he was sick of cutting 3/4" plywood spacers...Take a look

Tom

I checked out you're product and everything was great until I saw the price:eek: ,they are more expensive then the closet flange itself,which I thought was odd for an accessory. They would be worth the money if I was in a jam. I think I'll continue to install mine over the tile but it's an interesting product. I don't see anything impressive :no: about installing "four(4) flanges in less than hour". If I buy you're product I will have no money left for lunch and by the way.... tomorrow I'm having SPAM!:laughing:
 

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Mike Finley said:
So what's this talk about having to wait for the tile guy? Tile and flange should be flush right? You guys wait to set the flange after it's tiled? How does that work?
Mike,

When I rough a toilet I leave the 3" PVC drain about flush with the subfloor with a plug in it. I don't go back for finish until everything in the bath is done. Then I remove the plug and glue the flange on and the metal ring sits on top of the tile and with an 1/8" carbid bit I drill the six holes in the ring thru the tile and secure it to the subfloor with 2" screws. The outlet (horn) on the bottom of a toilet is flush with the base, so installing the flange on top puts the oulet inside the flange(maybe 1/4") as opposed to flush(no pun intended) or above. Although the flange being flush with the tile works...the wax ring becomes not only a seal but also a coupling.
 

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plumguy said:
Mike,

When I rough a toilet I leave the 3" PVC drain about flush with the subfloor with a plug in it. I don't go back for finish until everything in the bath is done. Then I remove the plug and glue the flange on and the metal ring sits on top of the tile and with an 1/8" carbid bit I drill the six holes in the ring thru the tile and secure it to the subfloor with 2" screws. The outlet (horn) on the bottom of a toilet is flush with the base, so installing the flange on top puts the oulet inside the flange(maybe 1/4") as opposed to flush(no pun intended) or above. Although the flange being flush with the tile works...the wax ring becomes not only a seal but also a coupling.
Wow i didn't no that. That means if you ever wanted to loose the tile floor you would have to have the plumber come in and reflange the toliet. That wouldn't be cheap. Plumguy I would imagine you would charge 3-500 for that.
 

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Mike Finley said:
Never ever seen it done that way.:eek:
One thing I've learned about these types of forums is that things are done differently throughout the country and that includes codes and enforcement.
 

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747 said:
Wow i didn't no that. That means if you ever wanted to loose the tile floor you would have to have the plumber come in and reflange the toliet. That wouldn't be cheap. Plumguy I would imagine you would charge 3-500 for that.
747,

That all depends on how youre's is installed and the condition of it. Price would depend on rates in your'e area and keeping in mind the plumber would have to make two trips. Having the flange on top of the tile is considered the right way around here. On a new house sometimes the customer has not selected tile or the type of underlayment (plywood,durarock,mud job,etc.) they want. If you install the flange on the rough you are commiting yourself to a floor height and I guess you would have to shim it:eek: and I can only imagine the condition of the ring...by the time finish is ready.
 

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plumguy said:
Mike,

When I rough a toilet I leave the 3" PVC drain about flush with the subfloor with a plug in it. I don't go back for finish until everything in the bath is done. Then I remove the plug and glue the flange on and the metal ring sits on top of the tile and with an 1/8" carbid bit I drill the six holes in the ring thru the tile and secure it to the subfloor with 2" screws. The outlet (horn) on the bottom of a toilet is flush with the base, so installing the flange on top puts the oulet inside the flange(maybe 1/4") as opposed to flush(no pun intended) or above. Although the flange being flush with the tile works...the wax ring becomes not only a seal but also a coupling.

Plumbers I have worked with do it this way too.
 

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I've been in many new construction jobs where the toilet is left stubbed up 3 feet or so until the final flooring is done. The foor level of the stub is wrapped with a few layers of corrugated cardboard so that the tile man doesn't set the tile tight against the stub (leaves room to glue the flange on later when cardboard is removed). After flooring, the stub is cut off, cardbaord removed and the flange installed. I'm not sure how plumber's in other areas feel about this method, but it does make for a handy "urinal" when working in the home during construction. :thumbsup:
 

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Tom R said:
Is there not such a thing as 'too much' information?? :cheesygri
We should start a thread about creative places you've taken a leak or a dump on a job when there was no porta-potty or restroom. :cool:
 

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mdshunk said:
I'm not sure how plumber's in other areas feel about this method, but it does make for a handy "urinal" when working in the home during construction. :thumbsup:

I always wondered why my new pipes already had an odor to them.:eek:
 

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mdshunk said:
We should start a thread about creative places you've taken a leak or a dump on a job when there was no porta-potty or restroom. :cool:
It is amazing how many workers have used my fixtures because they thought they were hooked up and completely installed!!:thumbdown :furious:
 

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plumguy said:
It is amazing how many workers have used my fixtures because they thought they were hooked up and completely installed!!:thumbdown :furious:
Charge the GC, I say. When no toilet facilities are provided, what's a man to do?

That reminds me of a "Jackass" episode where the one actor went into a plumbing supply store, whipped out a some reading material, sat down and proceeded to take a dump in one of the toilets on display. :jester:
 
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