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Home Repairs
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just about had a job wrapped up in a pet damaged house yesterday. I had to replace alot of urine soaked sub floor along with, hardwood floor refinishing, and wall and ceiling repairs to a couple bathrooms. (plaster house). As I am gathering up all my equipment, the real estate company agent walks in a says the owner was impressed with how the newly painted bathrooms turned out, and that they now want me to paint out the entire interior. I tried to talk her out of it by saying that a professional crew would be faster and probably cheaper. She again said the owners wanted me over another contractor because they already know me. I finally agreed to take on the job on the basis that might take me up to 14 days.

The house is a large 4 bedroom 60's era plaster ranch with semi gloss walls over sand swirl plaster. There is a large wood paneled family room also. I will be taking the sheen from semi gloss the eggshell. All the walls and ceilings are in great shape.

Questions:

1. The large paneled room has "real wood" paneling and there isn't much gloss on the finish. I'm thinking that it is going suck in alot of primer/paint before it has a acceptable finish. What would be the best primer to use to help cut down on the number of coats I will to apply.

2. Semi gloss walls (sand swirl): My Sherwin Williams rep insists that I can go right over the semi gloss with the "Super Paint" series....which is a primer paint. I'm not all that familiar with primer paints, and I have heard mixed reviews from others.

I am thinking that it would be (slower) but safer to use a real primer?




Thx...........John
 

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The general rule of thumb for painting is a surface needs to be clean, dry and dull.
Forget what the sales person says about the primer paints, all paints need a primer if a primer is necessary. Generally speaking previously painted surfaces don't need a primer if the paint is in decent condition, unless switching from oil paint to latex. I always spot prime any repaired areas.

For the semi gloss walls. Usually I would sand the walls to smooth them and scuff them slightly, in your case that is not an option so I think I would run over them with a long handle wire brush, just to scuff the surface slightly. Two coats of Superpaint will be just fine, satin finish would be as much shine as I would go (Superpaint doesn't come in eggshell)

For the real wood paneling I would prime it with SW Problock OIL primer. Again scuff it just slightly with a pole sander. Why the need for primer in this case? the surface of the paneling most likely a solvent based coating so an oil will be used to stick to it for sure, also oil will seal any wood knots. There are plenty of other appropriate primers for this. Do NOT use a water based primer for this (one reason the primer / paint in one is meaningless). One coat should be sufficient, don't be alarmed that it may look like [email protected] Let it dry and test an area with two coats of finish paint and see if it gives you the finish you want. Rarely is a second coat of primer needed for interior work.

Just for reference you should be able to sand a room in about 10 minutes, that is all it needs.

Crank up the radio and have fun.
 

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Home Repairs
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Ohio. SW was closed (sunday). I scuffed and wiped the paneling and ended up doing a couple 2' x 2' test areas on the with Zinnser 1-2-3 and some oil based Kilz that I had laying around. They layed down and locked on very well. I heading over there this morning to make sure nothing funny happened over night.

I am going with Pro Mar 200 for the rest of the walls. The owner wants eggshell.

Thanks again.
 

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The only thing I'll add is old wood paneling can have all kinds of stuff absorbed into it that can bleed out. I've had to 2 coat it to get full stain blocking before.
 

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Home Repairs
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The only thing I'll add is old wood paneling can have all kinds of stuff absorbed into it that can bleed out. I've had to 2 coat it to get full stain blocking before.
I noticed that this morning. The oil based Kilz showed no indication of bleed through. The Zinnser latex had a very slight trace.
 

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Home Repairs
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The paneled room came out great guys. One fairly heavy coat of oil primer & one coat of paint. I was fully expecting to do two coats on the walls because of the light color, but the first coat dried in pretty as hell.

The only negative was my spray unit burned up the motor. I had to paint each individual groove by hand. This took a while.......lol


Thanks guys!
 

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Hair Splitter
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Even with a primer I don't like only laying down one coat of color, light or not. One layer of paint just doesn't sit well with me. And light colors tend to hide areas that you missed or that are thin.
 

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Can I get an Amen?
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Even with a primer I don't like only laying down one coat of color, light or not. One layer of paint just doesn't sit well with me. And light colors tend to hide areas that you missed or that are thin.
I'm with TNT on this one.
I'm not a pro painter and I've never painted more than one room in any given house (accept my own) and I always sand, prime, sand, paint, paint.

Never have I painted on to any surface that I didn't prime.

Full time painters get much love from me, I appreciate and respect what they do.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I'm with TNT on this one.
I'm not a pro painter and I've never painted more than one room in any given house (accept my own) and I always sand, prime, sand, paint, paint.

Never have I painted on to any surface that I didn't prime.

Full time painters get much love from me, I appreciate and respect what they do.
I agree with you and TNT 100% percent on this. The owner showed up after I left the house for the evening. She called me to say that she couldn't believe how good those walls looked. I told her it was only the first coat. She said to leave it alone.
 

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I agree with you and TNT 100% percent on this. The owner showed up after I left the house for the evening. She called me to say that she couldn't believe how good those walls looked. I told her it was only the first coat. She said to leave it alone.
You wouldn't get that with a latex primer - that first coat would still be soaking in. I'm not sure a single top coat is going to hold up to cleaning, though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
You wouldn't get that with a latex primer - that first coat would still be soaking in. I'm not sure a single top coat is going to hold up to cleaning, though.

I believe you are right about this. The two test areas where I applied the oil base & latex were worlds apart. The latex browned out after about 12 hours and sucked into the paneling leaving a transparent film on the surface. The oil base locked on and left a nice coat for painting.

As far as the single coat of paint? I run into this all the time with agents and sellers. You and I know the durability won't be there, but all the agent and seller care about is getting the house to the closing table. :rolleyes:
 
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