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I just found this site and I love there is a dedicated forum to painting. I just have a few things on my mind that I would like to ask the experts. I consider myself a skilled DIYer up to speed on the tricks of the trade (this website among others) and many years and gallons of painting.

1) Occasionally I have to touch up a newly painted drywall surface, anywhere from 1 week to 1 year old. Fortunately I always keep leftovers of the original batch, and shake and stir well. The technique I use is to brush to seal the surface and then dab to diffuse the strokes. The color for the most part matches but not the sheen or texture. At times I have attempted to touch up with a 3 inch roller but whatever I do I can't seem to duplicate the original finish of the roller. I have even debated just to roll the entire wall. Others may not even notice but the touch up always sticks out like a sore thumb. Please help!

2) Whenever I paint take all necessary preparations, particulary I obsess over nail pops and the imperfections of sloppy painters and drywallers who came before me. I examine the walls very carefully with multiple 500W halogens (to note the imperfections seem to be spotted easier at night, in the shadows) for these trouble spots. I then patch over a period of 3-4 days letting the coats of patch cure properly. When the time comes to prime I notice that the primer or even first coat seem to sometimes pull out some nail pops (not the ones that I repaired). My theory on this is the moisture of the primer or paint actually pulls out the the thin original bone dry patch out from the nail head. It is just frustrating because this sets me back a few days while I repair a few of these pops. I know someone is going to recommend quick setting patch but I haven't decided to go there yet until they can make it pre mixed.

3) I recently painted a 4 coats of a interior flat deep red or merlot in a dining room. The finish seems to be chalky? I have never come across this before nor have I ever painted a color so deep. Is this due to number of coats or color? Will it remain chalky when it totally cures? Or is the chalkiness due to the fact is flat and not an enamel? What sheen will hide future imperfectionsthe best?

4) When I use a new roller I have pretty good success using tacky rubber gloves to wipe down the loose nap or hairs from a new roller. What do others do?

5) When pouring a one gallon can into a roller tray I always waste a few irritating minutes cleaning the recessed lip where the lid meets the can. I have tried all the infinite gimmicks they sell at the paint counters but none seem to work? Years ago I have seen Dutch Boy sell a pour type container, why hasn't this caught on? Any tips or products that you have found helpful?

Thanks for taking the time to read this.

Please Respond,
Ken
 

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My God Ken, who allows you in their home for days while a couple of nail-pops dry? Try using light weight spackle and a heat gun. Deep reds will always "chalk" up. Top-coat with a flat poly to end that or buy a quality paint in an eggshell finish. Lid pours?? just pour it out and wipe it off with your brush. If my guys do these things that you have mentioned, they hear about it....BIG waste of time. As for the touch-up, once the paint has had time to dry it will more than likely match its original .

Sorry for this rant, but I don't know :evil:
 

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1. We use a Wooster Jumbo Roller with a 50/50 or SuperFab roller covers. These blend well with most finishes. It sounds as if you are touching up fairly new homes. I bet the paint was sprayed and back rolled, so you won't be able to match it by hand.

2.
theory on this is the moisture of the primer or paint actually pulls out the the thin original bone dry patch out from the nail head
My theory is that you are pushing them out as you roll the wall. I've seen it happen in new construction alot, and in older homes where screws weren't used.

3. Most deep colors tend to burnish or chalk a little. What brand of paint?

4. We put the roller between the knees and run about 3' of tape back and forth over it, pulls out all the loose ones and fluffs it nicely.

5. I do as premier does, pour with minimal drippage, hit the edge with a brush, and move on. :Thumbs:
 
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