Contractor Talk - Professional Construction and Remodeling Forum banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am currently installing a redwood deck. It is my responsibility to seal it after it is complete. Since I live near the face of the sun the section of the deck that is exposed 100% is already turning color after just a couple days of exposure, meanwhile the section that is covered looks fantastic. I will be putting on a clear coat only. The only way I see to make it look tits is to buff the whole thing down with a big orbital sander, blow it off and seal it, as fast as possible. I know I will have to be careful as to not sand off the finish on the screws, so it will be a lick and a wish.

Does anyone have a simpler less expensive method to to make the finish uniform? I do not own this tool so it would be a rental. I have never operated one either, but i dont want to go tweaker status with an palm sized orbital sander, that would be ridiculous.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
24,787 Posts
IMO, you are wasting your time.

To get mediocre results you finish needs pigment in it to block the uv rays.

Never seen any product that keeps redwood or cedar looking new.

We just sealed them with woodlife and let it be.

Good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
so just touch sand the foot prints banding marks, marking paint, etc seal and be done with it. I like that idea far better. Ill have a talk with the home owners, give some selections. I had a feeling a clear sealer would be short lived
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
24,787 Posts
Yes.

Another consideration if you try a pigmented sealer is it will very quickly show traffic patterns and just recoating does not help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
they wanted a clear coat, so woodlife looks like the ticket, ill just advise them that wood greys, and there is no easy solution to it. Is it thin enough to apply with a hudson?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,961 Posts
You can treat it with a liquid “wood brightener.”

Not sure about Redwood, but with the KD Cedar I use, there is a shiny “mill glaze” on the boards that has to be sanded off or allowed to age off before being chemically brightened, before being stained.

I used water based sealant once.

I learned about TWP sealant on here. Only stuff I use now.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Stelzer Painting Inc.
Joined
·
187 Posts
Mill glaze is a real thing and something which should be removed before attempting to apply any sealant. I'm a big fan of non film-forming penetrating oils in semi-trans. TWP, Bakers, Armstrong Clark, and even Ready Seal. It's the pigment in those stains which act as the sacrificial UV barrier though, so just using a clear coat alone will do little to protect the wood from sun exposure.

If you're looking for efficient ways to prep it, of course a light power washing will be easiest and most efficient. On new wood, I'll typically downstream either a light bleach mix or even sodium hydroxide, followed by a direct application of oxalic acid, then a thorough rinse. If washing is out of the question and you want to remove mill glaze without the risk of removing a bunch of wood via sanding, look into to Osborn brushes. They can be attached to a buffer of any size and make quick work of it.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top