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I want to add sealcoating to my painting business as a way to package services and book more work. I plan to buy the right equipment to spray and fill cracks, not just a squegee and bucket. My question is, is there advice I could get on pricing? I know I'm probably going to get killed for asking that but, no offense to sealcoaters out there, this seems like a field that requires limited skill and pricing appears to be pretty general. Also, I am researching the best places to get equipment and would like to know if there is one particular brnad of sealcoat that is better or easier to work with. Thanks in advance...
 

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my asphalt driveway is 700 feet long and needs some help what is the difference between spraying and mopping
 

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my asphalt driveway is 700 feet long and needs some help what is the difference between spraying and mopping
Spraying is much faster then mopping but Mopping holds up better . spraying it doesn't fill in the cracks as well .
I recapped driveways, sealed and striped pavement in a past life.
The best place to buy a tank and sprayer is in the want adds used .
alot of guys sell out this time of year.
The funny thing about the sealer is in the late 70 s early 80s all the sealer was the same stuff from the same vat . We would buy from a supplier 1/2 an hour away . We could pull 300gallons of material in a 500 gallon tank on our spray trailer . When we are at the plant they have 5 gallon buckets every where and they just change labels and color of buckets but channel lumber , rickles, sears all had the same stuff . John
 

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I know I'm probably going to get killed for asking that but, no offense to sealcoaters out there, this seems like a field that requires limited skill and pricing appears to be pretty general.
Sealcoating with the right equipment is a full-time job. This isn't something you can just dabble in. The equipment needs to be constantly maintained, and YOU need to know your equipment from front to back. This requires mechanical knowledge, and some rudimentary plumbing skills.

Furthermore, TONS of skill is required to set yourself apart from the unskilled sealcoaters out there. Good technique takes YEARS to acquire, and must be practiced continually to keep from getting rusty. Here's some things to consider before getting into this "unskilled trade":

-Mix design.
-Weather variables, pavement temperatures, water fogging in hot weather, knowing what additives to use at what times.
-Equipment maintenance and repair.
-Possible DOT restrictions on equipment.
-Licensing.
-Knowledge of the product you are putting down.
-Understanding different brush types and techniques.
-Understanding different spray methods / equipment
-Proper prepping skills (A LOT more than just running a leaf blower).

I haven't even covered crack sealing and line striping yet. Pavement maintenance is a very complex, multifaceted business. You can get into trouble VERY quickly if you don't know what you're doing. I see SO many guys assuming that it's "so easy" just because they saw someone spray a driveway once. Trust me, it isn't easy. This is an art and a legitimate skilled trade that real contractors are in for LIFE. You've gotta be prepared to either totally jump in, or don't bother. NOBODY is ever successful in this business just doing it on the "side". But hey, don't take my word for it.
 

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Good post travelcoater :thumbsup:

It just goes to show that we shouldn't make assumptions about another mans trade.

I honestly never knew all that info.
I'm feeling smarter already though :clap:


I think I'll open a recoat business, any more tips?

:laughing: JK
 

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I agree with "Travelcoater", there is alot to learn with this type of work. But the best way to learn is trial and error. Start out sealcoating small jobs, maybe like your driveway. And make sure you do your research. Alot of the big asphalt sealer manufacturers have training material for the contractors. :thumbsup:
And if you are looking for some used sealcoating equipment try out www.asphalttrader.com
 

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Yea... not something you just dabble in, it's a full time gig. I helped my buddy start up his sealcoating/striping biz a few years back and there were many many mistakes made along the way with improper equipment, improper plumbing, improper product, improper application, etc. It took a few freebies before we had all the kinks worked out and could actually go out and blow out a big job and make any money doing it.

If you can buy a small rig that's already set up, get a few lessons from the owner, and find a supplier for the coating you'll have a better start than we did. Good Luck.
 

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I helped my buddy start up his sealcoating/striping biz a few years back and there were many many mistakes made along the way with improper equipment, improper plumbing, improper product, improper application, etc. It took a few freebies before we had all the kinks worked out and could actually go out and blow out a big job and make any money doing it.
Being a successful sealcoater takes way more than just being able to do a good job, or having the equipment to do it. It takes a lot of finesse with the customers, and you've gotta use the right English to get those jobs. You've gotta be a hustler, and know what to say. There's a lot of psychology that's involved both in selling the jobs, and on your end as a contractor.

I've been doing this for 13 years, and I can honestly say that it's incredibly rare for me to actually see my own dried, cured work after the caution tape and stakes have been taken down from the entrance of a driveway. From April through October, it's one right after the other....as fast as I can get the product on the ground. I've always attributed the sealcoating business (at least here in the Northern states) in the same light as baseball. The seasons coincide, and it's all about putting up good numbers. He11, I even take a little week-long vacation every year at the all star break, as it's the mid-point in my work season.
 

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Being a successful sealcoater takes way more than just being able to do a good job, or having the equipment to do it. It takes a lot of finesse with the customers, and you've gotta use the right English to get those jobs. You've gotta be a hustler, and know what to say. There's a lot of psychology that's involved both in selling the jobs, and on your end as a contractor.
He uses the Queens english to sell em' :laughing:. He's a silver tongued devil from England, he could talk the panties off of a nun, i've seen him do it ;).

Not a job for me though, it was fun, it was cool to try something new, just not for me.
 

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I can definitely agree with the guys, that sealcoating isn't just something you add to your services, unless you're already doing paving work. There are many fairly large companies who make bank just doing sealcoating work... It's big money.

The equipment upkeep is another big point, you aren't gonna make any money if your equipment is garbage and constantly breaks.
 

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I can definitely agree with the guys, that sealcoating isn't just something you add to your services, unless you're already doing paving work. There are many fairly large companies who make bank just doing sealcoating work... It's big money.

The equipment upkeep is another big point, you aren't gonna make any money if your equipment is garbage and constantly breaks.
I bet he made his decision 8 years ago when he made this thread......

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