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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
my question is this
I did a tearout on a customers house and the exterior walls are earth and rocks. Im about to reframe to put up drywall and roxul insulation. Do I need to seal exterior walls firs and if so with what?
Please see attached photo
 

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Capra Aegagrus
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Given that Roxul is a Canadian company, I'm guessing that's where you're from--though that has no relevance to the question.

If that wall is really composed of rocks and dirt, I honestly don't know how it can be properly sealed, and it very much needs to be. I'd be thinking about building a masonry wall in its place. Not a cheap fix.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
ive attached another photo , hopefully this is a little clearer,its not exactaly earth and stone. i cant really describe it but its not like you can get out a shovel and start digging. it is pretty solid. i have had a few people tell me what to do but im not so sure they specialize in this sort of scenario. all i want to do is scrub the lose stuff with a wire brush and do what needs to be done as for sealing/parging etc before i frame and insulate

what i need to know is what i need to use and how many steps may be involved

thank you for any guidance
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
done! trenched all downspouts with weeping tile well away from house. recaulked all eaves, changed grade to slope away from house. im positive ive remedied all exterior work
thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
sorry i havent dug up around house to footings and sealed. i told the homeowner this was probably the best way to go about it but he doesnt seem to interested in the cost of doing so
 

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That just looks like an old masonry foundation that has been painted. Alot of times the mortar is like sand and just crumbles. Sealing it on the inside will do nothing. Your best bet is to monitor it after it rains. As for the drywall, I would use a mold resistant board. Maybe have the customer sign a waiver saying that the best way to resolve moisture issues is from the outside and due to cost customer declines. Contractor shall not be held responsible for moisture and mold issues.
 

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Correcting the grade, extending the gutters, etc that you did are all great for helping prevent water.

Because the walls are so porous, you have to be concerned with indoor humidity condensating on the cold exterior walls and then being absorbed by the walls. This will cause further deterioration later. A good dehumidifier or hvac system to control the indoor air humidity is a must.

There is also a product that has a very thin viscosity that readily absorbs deep into the deteriorated masonry and drys to a crystaline form. It hardens the soft and deteriorated masonry. I just can't recall the name right now but it begins with "E".

I'd document that the homeowner didn't take you advice about installing drains outside to gaurd against them holding you responsible if it continues to leak later on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
advice bbefore i go any further

I have added a few more photos
I have washed all walls with bleach and scrubbed thouroughly.
My next thought is Parging the walls?
Is this the right course of action?
 

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How about hydrocide? Since it's used to seal the outside of foundation walls, it'd probably work pretty well for your purposes. Just roll it on with a heavy knap roller and call it good.
 
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