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Discussion Starter #1
how long do you generally wait to seal a concrete sidewalk? i've heard so many different answers
 

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Renaissance Man
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Not being a smart a$$ but, you need to research the product spec sheet for determination - It will state proper directions. These things vary from product to product and like T said, what's the intended purpose - waterproofing? curing? salt guard? c'mon get wtp...now ask that question again.
 

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Renaissance Man
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This is what I use

Prosoco Saltguard WB




OVERVIEW

Consolideck® Saltguard® WB is a ready-to-use water-based, VOC compliant silane/siloxane water repellent and “chloride screen” for the protection of concrete and masonry. Saltguard® WB penetrates more deeply than conventional water- or solvent-based water repellents. Low odor and alkaline stable, Saltguard® WB is ideal for field or in-plant application to concrete and most masonry. Saltguard® WB protects horizontal and vertical surfaces from moisture intrusion and chemical attack of chloride salts.

In coastal areas, Saltguard® WB protects against salt air by screening chlorides from penetrating through concrete to the reinforcing steel. Saltguard® WB reduces rebar corrosion and surface spalling caused by water-carried salts. Use Saltguard® WB on horizontal surfaces such as driveways, sidewalks, tile or brick pavers. Provides excellent protection for retaining walls, bridge pilings and other vertical areas exposed to de-icing salts.

Saltguard® WB is a ready-to-use effective alternative to conventional solvent-based silanes and siloxanes. Saltguard® WB penetrates and chemically bonds deep within the concrete or masonry substrate to provide long-lasting protection against moisture intrusion and water-related staining or deterioration. Properly applied, Saltguard® WB produces no surface film. Treated surfaces keep their natural breathing characteristics and natural appearance.

ADVANTAGES
• Penetrates to produce long-lasting protection on vertical or horizontal surfaces.

• Water-based formula minimizes explosion and fire hazards associated with alcohol- or solvent-based water repellents.

• Easy soap-and-water cleanup from window glass, window frames and application equipment.

• Low odor reduces risk of application to occupied buildings.

• Alkaline stable – suitable for new “green” concrete, 14-28 days old.

• Treated surfaces “breathe” – does not trap moisture.

• Effective protection against de-icing salts and salt air.

• Complies with all known national, state and district AIM VOC regulations.
Limitations

• Not suitable for protecting surfaces subject to constant water spray (car washes).

• Not suitable for application to coated surfaces or surfaces previously treated with water repellents or liquid hardeners.

• Will not prevent water penetration through structural cracks, defects or open joints.

• Water repellency of treated surfaces will increase for up to 14 days after application.

• Saltguard® WB is not suitable for application to synthetic resin paints, gypsum, or other non masonry surfaces. The product may not be suitable for surfaces to receive paints or coatings. Always test for compatibility.
 

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Renaissance Man
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T- this probably isn't too popular around Cen. Tex, but around here with the freeze/thaw issues and plenty of salt, this is a great product. Also widely used in marine settings (salt water).

I basically offer this sealer for residential sidewalks and driveways in which people plan to salt - a lot of commercial apps as well...courthouse steps, schools, malls, etc...
 

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superseal : do you think that the WB siloxane is better than the solvent siloxane? Not looking to argue, just have zero experiance with the WB optin in the siloxane. I've been meaning to try it, but have just felt content with the solvent.


To the original question, the sooner the better IMO, but only with a cure & seal. I prefer WB myself, as we had problems with very early sealing with a very common solvent based many years ago. We all know water & oil don't mix, so I really don't feel comfortable using a solvent based cure/seal right behind the broom.

WB, on the other hand, is far easier & forgiving on every front IMO. 30 minutes after brooming is very typical for us. Just don't expect any kind of long term protection against freeze-thaw cycles, stains, de-icers, etc............
 

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Renaissance Man
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I wouldn't say better...One of the best products i ever used was solvent based Sil-Act 42... unbeatable flow and coverage, just got sick of the hazardous aspects of the stuff. Long ago I discovered Sure-Klean Weatherseal PD WB and haven't looked back.

Will admit though, applying WB requires a lil' more work spreading the material, but I gotten use to it and the trade-off in user safety and clean-up is worth the effort.

I know where you coming from on this one...but the WB's do work longterm and i believe this was the stigma in the beginning.
 

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CKConcreteConstruction
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you should seal your concrete as soon as you can .. Cure and seal is made to slow down the curing process which inturn creates stronger concrete... The slower is cures the stronger it is... Especially in the summer months because if it dries to fast shrinkage cracks will occur... Whoever tells you that you should wait doesnt know a whole lot about concrete.. The only exceptions to this rule are , colored and decorative concrete. Dont be cheap on the sealer either... A good concrete sealer will resist salt and stains for up to about 5 years, and its always better to apply 2 thin coats instead of one thick coat.
 
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