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Discussion Starter #1
we have been having a lot of trouble lately when screwing our ceilings to the mf ceiling furrings. occasionally the screws will screw in tight but most of the time they are going in and then just spinning before they have managed to countersink into the board properly.
I use the hilti drywall gun with collated attachment, it seems to be a bit better if i take the attachment off and put the nosecone on, but still does it sometimes and is not productive speed wise.
ive tried hilti and senco collated screws and was thinking that it may be down to the metal we are using, were using arrow metal for this job which has been supplied as its about half the price of Lafarge metal, so I was thinking its probably a lot thinner gauge which is causing our problems, but looking at the specs it seems to be the same gauge as the lafarge metal (0.55mm)
any ideas ?
 

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Sounds like maybe a screw type problem, too long a shoulder or thread type. Thinner metal furring maybe too much torque on the screw gun?
 

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Are you having troubles on the recesses only or the feild too? We have had problems before with 25 gauge metal. when screwing the recessed edges they strip out before countersinking because the board is more dense where the recess is. We just stay close to the edge of the board and it helps out alot. Also if you run the gun at a slower speed (not locked on full speed) helps too.
 

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This may be too obvious, but are you using a fine thread screw? Coarse thread are the common type used for drywall to wood, but they don't bite into metal well.
 

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Thats been happening for a few yrs now. Seems that metal is a little softer and rock can be harder.............bad combo. No quality control any more.
Try a battery gun and ease in the screws in some of the stubborn aeras. Also the hilti has a high rpm , try a different screwgun with slower speed. The finisher is going to love you. Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Cheers for replies guys, yes using fine thread screws, they are countersinking and biting properly on the tapered edge of the board, its just in the field that were having problems, thought it might have been down to the arrow brand metal but its the same spec as the lafarge (0.55) and have since found out that it is arrow that produce lafarges metal for them.
My Hilti is battery operated but will try running it slower.
And as for the finisher......thats me !
 

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Have you tried different screw brands? If yes, were there any differences?
It could be that the screwdriver has too many rpms. Could you ask your Hilti rep to let you try with an SD 2500? This tool has less rpm, hence might work better for such thin metal. At least I have heard this before ...
 

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You can also try a thicker screw, your probably using #6's, a #8 may hold a little better for the difficult areas.
 

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Try This

Fine thread screws are good for 20 g metal and some 25g metal however recently it seems that a fine thread screw wont bite all 25 g metal. I would ditch the cordless tool and get a 4000 rpm screwgun and a box of 1 1/4 HiLo screws. They are also known as alternating thread screws. Problem solved
 

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Fine thread screws are good for 20 g metal and some 25g metal however recently it seems that a fine thread screw wont bite all 25 g metal. I would ditch the cordless tool and get a 4000 rpm screwgun and a box of 1 1/4 HiLo screws. They are also known as alternating thread screws. Problem solved
the wood pointers seem to hold \well in the 25 gauge stuff, and the sharp tip bites into the metal instead vs the self-tapping tip pushing it away from the gun.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
it seems ok now with senco fine thread screws. have been starting them off slower and it seems to be fine, the hilti fine threads we have are definately a thinner shank than the senco's, will try the hiltis again tomorrow incase it was just a bad batch of metal we were using before.
All the fine thread screws ive seen are sharp point, the only self drilling ones we use are the 14mm tack heads we use to screw metal together.
 

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All steel studs?
for the most part yes. we RARELY use the lighter gauge studs. mainly use the light gauge for temp containment walls, and for that the wall does not need to be perfect so it does not matter much if the screw does not countersink. but on heavier gauge studs if the fine threads dont want to screw in we will switch to coarse thread pointers
 
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