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Steve
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317 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am starting a job this week to replace the screening on the underside of a deck 10 feet off the ground. Area is 14 X 24
I will be working alone and have devised a way to keep tension on the 48" roll of screening by using foam on each side of a 1" fence top rail squeezed tightly against the roll with spring clamps. Rail will be hung off balusters above with bungee cordsand moved every 48". I hope to be able to pull the screen and staple it up without the remainder of the roll becoming a disaster. Has anyone done similar work and what did you do to keep the screen semi-tight while you stapled it up?
 

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Capra Aegagrus
Remodeler
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25,289 Posts
That sounds almost as difficult as just pre-cutting each piece to the rough size and just stapling a bit at a time, doing final trim after you have it up. Or maybe my mental image isn't doing it justice.

When possible, especially if working alone, I prefer to make a set of frames and screen each one independently. A major advantage of that is that if anything falls through the cracks above, it's relatively easy to nondestructively retrieve it by just removing one of the frames.
 

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Sean
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5,534 Posts
I do the frames - but I will put them end to end, roll the screening out over both - staple the top edge tensioning it tight left to right, pulling it tight to the bottom of the second one and stapling. Cut the excess off & treating the screen like a book cover - close the book. Staple & cut the screen at the "binding" - trim as necessary

If that doesn't pull it tight enough - put a 1x3 bookmark in there & close the book

Sorry for the book illustration, but it's the only way I can describe it without drawing it.
 

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Capra Aegagrus
Remodeler
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25,289 Posts
Yes, that's an excellent way of getting some really good tension. My remark about screening them independently was really just about the concept of using discrete units as opposed to covering a large area in a single run.

Good tip!
 
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