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DGR,IABD
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Discussion Starter #1
I've witnessed on many occasions painting contractors scraping the old loose paint off buildings with pressure washers. I'm sure that this does a reasonably good job at removing the loose paint, but it seems like it would drive a heck of a lot of moisture into the wood or brick that is going to be repainted. Is this an advisable practice? If it is done, how long until you can spot prime and repaint? Is there a benchmark moisture level, above which you can't paint the material?
 

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Painting Contractor
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We scrape, sand, then pressure wash. We get a much better surface after. We have tried to pressure wash before sanding and it just screwed the wood up something terrible.
 

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...jammin
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mdshunk said:
I'm sure that this does a reasonably good job at removing the loose paint, but it seems like it would drive a heck of a lot of moisture into the wood or brick that is going to be repainted.
It does and it does
mdshunk said:
If it is done, how long until you can spot prime and repaint?
I wait three days of sun for wood
Less for other materials or if it's not too humid and really sunny, or I didn't have to really soak it
 

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...jammin
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mdshunk said:
Is there a benchmark moisture level, above which you can't paint the material?
It should be on the can or in the paperwork that came with it (Sikkens)
 

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Painting Contractor
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slickshift said:
I wait three days of sun for wood
Less for other materials or if it's not too humid and really sunny, or I didn't have to really soak it
What do you do for those three days?
 

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...jammin
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Humble Abode said:
What do you do for those three days?
:)
Sorry, I should have said: A minumum of three days
Often it's a week before I get back
Or I'll try and PW on a Fri and start the rest on Monday
 

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slickshift said:
:)
Sorry, I should have said: A minumum of three days
Often it's a week before I get back
Or I'll try and PW on a Fri and start the rest on Monday
That's what I'll "try" to do. I hate down time. I don't have many side projects to work on, wish I did. But I like to get in there and get out as soon as possible, within the parameters of a quality job of course.

I would rather scrape and sand for three days than spackle after I tear up the siding.
 

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...jammin
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Humble Abode said:
I like to get in there and get out as soon as possible, within the parameters of a quality job of course.
Me too
Scheduling other work when a job's just started bugs me (as in PW one place, go somewhere else for 3-7 days, come back)
And can be awkward, but you get used to it, or get the hang of it
Humble Abode said:
I would rather scrape and sand for three days than spackle after I tear up the siding.
Tear up the siding PWing?
I've never had to spackle after PWing...
Well, not because of the PWing anyway
 

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slickshift said:
Me too
Scheduling other work when a job's just started bugs me (as in PW one place, go somewhere else for 3-7 days, come back)
And can be awkward, but you get used to it, or get the hang of it

Tear up the siding PWing?
I've never had to spackle after PWing...
Well, not because of the PWing anyway
The first time I powerwashed wood siding it took big chunks out of the wood, along the grain. So I havn't done it since. I would surely be interested to know if I was doing something wrong.
 

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...jammin
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Humble Abode said:
I would surely be interested to know if I was doing something wrong.
Hmmm....
Maybe PM me all the details?

There have been houses I wouldn't PW because of condition...
But I probably PWed only more houses than I painted this season
We have horrible mold/mildew around here, so PWing is a pretty good gig
Not just paint prep

Actually this brings me around to another point and refers back to your earlier question in this thread, and possibly the original poster's question
Brb...
 

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slickshift said:
Hmmm....
Maybe PM me all the details?
I don't know how many details there are... We used the correct tip, always stayed at least a six inches to a foot from the material. This was old 3" wood siding.

We pressure wash all types of surfaces, but with wood we stick to just 'washing' it with the pressure washer and not trying to peal paint, for fear of gouging it.
 

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...jammin
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OK I'm back

So far the biggest "problem" I have with this is the down-time
I have to schedule other work while the project dries out
Around here it can take over a week
High humidity all-year round, salt water on one side, fresh on the other, brakish on the third side, heavy fog in the AM, dew by dusk...you get the idea

I am a one man op here
I get help every now and then, and would like to be more efficient with a little more help
I have been thinking of next season
It'd be great if I could send someone out to PW the houses or decks before I get there
I could follow a week or so behind, depending on condition/weather make some adjustments

The problem is, I do PWing by feel
It's waaaay to easy to destroy a H/O's property with a PWer
I simply don't trust any part-time help with that sort of thing

I have been looking into a system of measuring the pressure (or actualGPM) out of the customer's home, and limiting the GPM (thus the pressure) "at the tip"
I'm assuming I should get an accurate # and have seen charts for these type of calc's
This area has a large number of wells and the GPM out the house can vary greatly so I would need a measurement "at the bib"

This would be a max pressure "at the tip" and backing off the wand would lower the pressure
But I'm theorizing it could limit the damage that could be done if the Max Pressure fir the house or deck was accurate

If I could organize a chart of max pressures for conditons of customer's property, maybe it could work

During the estimating process I would give the house a PW number
The max pressure I would feel comfortable letting PT help squirt on it

I could later then say to my helper, run down to Mrs. Desperatehousewife's house and PW it
Use Tip # XXX on the machine
If you get more than ZZ on the bib gauge, switch to KKK on the tip
Do Not go over QQQ on the tip

That's pretty much what I do now, except it's all by feel and in my head
 

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...jammin
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Humble Abode said:
We pressure wash all types of surfaces, but with wood we stick to just 'washing' it with the pressure washer and not trying to peal paint, for fear of gouging it.
That's a good idea
I don't think I'm trying to peal it so to speak, it just helps loosen the loose stuff
I would call it PW scraping as opposed to PW stripping
 

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slickshift said:
OK I'm back

So far the biggest "problem" I have with this is the down-time
I have to schedule other work while the project dries out
Around here it can take over a week
High humidity all-year round, salt water on one side, fresh on the other, brakish on the third side, heavy fog in the AM, dew by dusk...you get the idea

I am a one man op here
I get help every now and then, and would like to be more efficient with a little more help
I have been thinking of next season
It'd be great if I could send someone out to PW the houses or decks before I get there
I could follow a week or so behind, depending on condition/weather make some adjustments

The problem is, I do PWing by feel
It's waaaay to easy to destroy a H/O's property with a PWer
I simply don't trust any part-time help with that sort of thing

I have been looking into a system of measuring the pressure (or actualGPM) out of the customer's home, and limiting the GPM (thus the pressure) "at the tip"
I'm assuming I should get an accurate # and have seen charts for these type of calc's
This area has a large number of wells and the GPM out the house can vary greatly so I would need a measurement "at the bib"

This would be a max pressure "at the tip" and backing off the wand would lower the pressure
But I'm theorizing it could limit the damage that could be done if the Max Pressure fir the house or deck was accurate

If I could organize a chart of max pressures for conditons of customer's property, maybe it could work

During the estimating process I would give the house a PW number
The max pressure I would feel comfortable letting PT help squirt on it

I could later then say to my helper, run down to Mrs. Desperatehousewife's house and PW it
Use Tip # XXX on the machine
If you get more than ZZ on the bib gauge, switch to KKK on the tip
Do Not go over QQQ on the tip

That's pretty much what I do now, except it's all by feel and in my head

Slickshift.. Thats a good idea to measure the well output. It doesn't matter if the output at the bib is more than needed.The pump on the washer is a positive displacement..it'll only take so much so it doesn't matter.
 

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...jammin
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Dale said:
Slickshift.. Thats a good idea to measure the well output. It doesn't matter if the output at the bib is more than needed.The pump on the washer is a positive displacement..it'll only take so much so it doesn't matter.
Thanks Dale,
The bib gauge is more for wells that kick out what seems like OK GPMs at first, then slowly drop, or for an actual confirmation that they are OK to begin with...or not
I have been worried that it's dropping below the level my machine needs to operate on
Some houses the GPM was questionable
I'd like that to be a measurable factor also
If it drops below X.X, shut down the machine
 

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Pressure Washer

I had a barn I wanted to paint I asked a painter friend about how do I paint it he suggest that I pressure wash and paint it.
He suggest that I purchase a washer from Walmart no more than 1300 psi
I did paid $ 94.00 ( 2 years ago) he said any higher psi would lift the wood grain up. I pressure washed the barn let it dry about a week went over it with roufght sand paper, pressure washed it to clean the wood, painted it
Looks beautiful
 

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Pro Painter
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Doh! Pressure washing is half of what I do. I have seen what it can do to just about every surface in the hands of an in-experienced person. Brick mortar, the daggon bricks, fences, siding, ugh! The trick to cleaning everything with the machine is distance and using the proper tip. Use the widest fan/lowest pressure tip (not the cleaning solution tip) from like 4-6' away from the surface just showering, and you can get closer slowly judging how much pressure and abuse the substrate is taking. Moderation is the key though.
 

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AAPaint said:
Doh! Pressure washing is half of what I do. I have seen what it can do to just about every surface in the hands of an in-experienced person. Brick mortar, the daggon bricks, fences, siding, ugh! The trick to cleaning everything with the machine is distance and using the proper tip. Use the widest fan/lowest pressure tip (not the cleaning solution tip) from like 4-6' away from the surface just showering, and you can get closer slowly judging how much pressure and abuse the substrate is taking. Moderation is the key though.
I am definantly that inexperienced person when it comes to pressure washers. That's why we implemented the no pressure on wood siding rule I stated before.

I hate experimenting with other peoples property, so as a rule we don't do it. I do feel confident that we will get the hang of it though, and for now we practice on materials we are not likely to destroy in our learning phase.
 
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