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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi, just start this thread to learn more about other technique on sanding.
Let's start by myself.
95% of my job are in OAK

New timberflooring standard parralel planks
Cut 1 - 15° cut with 40 grit /
Cut 2 - straight cut along the planks with 40 grit /
Cut 3 - last cut along the planks with an 80 grit.
Edges 40 / 80.
If varnished no buffering. If oiled I will buffer with a 100 grit.

Refinishing standard parrallel planks

Cut 1 - 15° cut 16 / 24 or 36 grit / depending on the floor/ most of the refinishing are with 36 grit
Cut 2 - straight cut along the planks with 36 grit /
Cut 3 - last cut along the planks with an 80 grit.
Edges 36 / 80.
If varnished no buffering. If oiled I will buffer with a 100 grit.


Refinishing Herringbone or other designed floor New flooring

Cut 1 - 45° cut 36 grit /
Cut 2 - 45° cut 36 grit cross cut in other direction
Cut 3 - cross cut 45° 50 grit /
Cut 4 - cross cut 45° 80 grit.
Buffer - 60 grit
Buffer - 80 grit
Buffer - 100 grit for oak
Buffer - 120 grit if Maple / Walnut / or other hard tropical wood.
Edges - 36 / 80.

For edgers - 36 / 80 grit remain my first choice for the last 10 yrs.
For standard planks / I'm a fan of the 36 / 80 grit for both edger and drum sanding. When varnished no buffering at all.
 

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Thats pretty similar to how I roll. I always buff to 120 before the first coat but have been considering not. I always figured you would get more build per coat if the floor was smoother.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
No more info about others, hey I wish knowing your way to do it. comme on man
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Who ever did on a refinishing a 36 grit and an 80 grit / corners 36 and 80 grit, no buffing , just varnish after.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
If it's an old style timber flooring, I mean all the boards are parrallel.
Why not? Sanding with 100 to 120 grit , means you will save varnish or oil. It's a mistake that I have been doing for years. Believing that the finer the grit the better it is. NO, at 80 grit, we will use more product which will penetrate the wood pores, the finer the sanding, the more the pores will be closed. With an 80 grit, you will have more varnish or oil penetrating the wood pores and make the floor stronger against dirts and other chemicals products.




I know a bit more while getting older, unfortunately when I will know it all, it will be time to leave. This is life.
 

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Ok ok. Oak refinish, laid straight.

40 grit run hybrid. Ie 15 degrees on the down stroke and stright back on the pull stroke. High medium pressure. Edger 36.

Fill with woodwise grain filler. Run vaccum and heaters during lunch to aid drying.

Return from lunch cut 80 straight. Edge 80. If residential 3ds at 100 and 120. Corners last with 60 grit fein triangle pads. If low cost rentals buffer with 120 grit screen then corners.

Apply finish.

Return next day, screen with sand dollar or similar, abrade perimeter with 220 grit dewalt palm sander. Coat two more times, buffer onky in between (no palm sanding)
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
I do sand with a palmsander on edges before, now to work in a confortable position the next day, I will do my best not to kneel down, I call it a rest day for my knees. I fixed a 220 grit on a brush ( broom with hard bristle) and will just brush it standing with a long handle, will take a picture of it soon. To reduce all these work, I'm doing the RUBIO MONOCOAT finish more often, no buffering, for small M² no need to come back the next day.

http://s1162.photobucket.com/user/jmsign/media/KGS-PC/103NOKIA/2014-06-03-2351.jpg.html?sort=3&o=22
 
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