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i have been in the installation and qc roofing business now for three years. i am just entering the world of sales. the thing is i know i can sell, but i lack a good sales pitch. im not really sure where or how to start putting a pitch together. not that i want a scripted pitch. but definetly would like to put a track to my pitch. any help would be great.
 

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Flooring Guru
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One thing is to explain Features, Benifits, and advantages.

Oh yea,

start high and work your way down...

way easier
 

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...jammin
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I don't know a lot about roofing, but I used to train salespersons
The first thing I did was say sell me (show me what you got so far)
That way I'd know what I had to work with

So soldiermccoy, my house looks like it needs a new roof
Whataya got?
 

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I'm an electrician...

When starting one of my informal sales pitches, usually when I'm at their home doing an estimate, I say "I'm an electrician, not a salesman, if you'll show me what you want, I'll tell you what it costs to do that, no more and no less"...

I'm wearing my toolbelt, I've opened their panel and poked around a bit, so I really look like the seasoned journeyman electrician, not a salesman.

This disarms them and reduces sales resistance...
 

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DGR,IABD
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I ain't no salesman, but adapting my electrician's pitch to roofing:

1)After you've roughly measured up the job, sit down with them and say, "there's a couple of ways you can go with this...", and proceed to talk about the features and benefits of different options, whatever they might be (slate, 20 year 3 tabs, 50 year archi's, etc.)
2) Talk about options. "Now would be a good time to replace those tired gutters and downspouts", or "Sure would be nice to think about the windows too.", etc.
3) Talk about some things your competitor's might suggest, and why they are bad ideas. Also, talk about why they should do business with you.
4) Ask for the sale. (If you're not prepared to do the estimate on the spot, right there in the home, I don't believe you should even be visiting them yet. Be prepared to do an on the spot estimate, as that is the only way you can get the sale right then and there.)

I'm interested in what others come up with for you. Somewhere between tradesmen and salesmen lies the Grand Canyon. It's a rare guy that can straddle both sides.
 

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I would ditch the pitch and get a complete system in place. A system would include a step by step process starting at ringing the door bell to ending with closing the door behind you when you are done.

A 'pitch' (shuddering at even writing that word) should just be one small part of the whole process. The 'pitch' can be very short when it is surrounded by a successful system. Issues to address in your system should be not in any particular order, an analysis of what type of customer you are facing, what the customer needs are and what the customers budget it, analysis to determine which unique products you can offer that solve the customers problem while maximizing profit, a discovery process that convinces the customer why your company is worth doing business with, a presentation of a solution tailored for this customer, a trial close, asking for the sale, a closing session where you overcome objections, and finally a part where you either get the sale or leave the customer with the option of closing the sale at a later time.
 

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Very well put Mike. Tight and concise.
 

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I'm the opposite of Flor. I have found the "would you like fries with that?" sales approach (call upselling) works for me much better. I have had many many professional salesmen tell me I am wrong but numbers do not lie. I usually close more sales than them. I prefer to give a base price with optional upgrades. It allows the customer to customize their purchase.

In regards to features and benefits that's a must. I explain to the customer the basics and expect them to ask questions, then I go into detail when they ask questions. I always tell them why something is important... important to THEM.

"Mr. Customer it is important that staples are not used to fasten your shingles. It is important because staples do not have the holding power that nails do, and around here they are against code but some guys still use them. You will probably have wind problems if staples are used."

Feature? nails. Benefit? holding power NO WIND PROBLEMS.

Simply put... Tell the customer what you are going to do and why it will benefit them and why you are better than everyone else. Sometimes just the fact that you MEET with your customer sets you apart because in our business so many just leave a hand written proposal in the mail box... not too professional IMO.
 

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Grumpy said:
I'm the opposite of Flor. I have found the "would you like fries with that?" sales approach (call upselling) works for me much better. I have had many many professional salesmen tell me I am wrong but numbers do not lie. I usually close more sales than them. I prefer to give a base price with optional upgrades. It allows the customer to customize their purchase.
Yo What He Said!

For certain business models and industries that type of system can be a gold mine and help you stop being one of 3 bids.
 
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