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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone implemented safety incentive programs that have produced a positive result? I know OSHA does not agree with this because they don't find them effective. Many contractors begin to implement something like this in an attempt to lower their experience modification factor for insurance reasons. What has worked for you? What problems are you facing?
 

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Worked several years ago at a manufacturing plant, the best result was safety meetings. Every Friday was group meeting and a safety topic was visited. Then the safety director would go around handing out 20's every now and then when someone was doing the right thing. Usually someone that would always wear eye and ear protection. Sometime during the year a lunch would be bought and so on. But you must keep the safety thing going. A lot of the subjects would actually be being safe away from work so you can make it back to work. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Worked several years ago at a manufacturing plant, the best result was safety meetings. Every Friday was group meeting and a safety topic was visited. Then the safety director would go around handing out 20's every now and then when someone was doing the right thing. Usually someone that would always wear eye and ear protection. Sometime during the year a lunch would be bought and so on. But you must keep the safety thing going. A lot of the subjects would actually be being safe away from work so you can make it back to work. :)
I think the most important thing you said was to keep safety going at all times. It's not something you can only push every 6 months when the insurance guy comes around.

In anyone's experience in the field, have you seen many workers get injured on personal time and then come to work and fake an injury for a work comp claim?
 

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My corporate overlords are of the opinion that you shouldn't have to bribe someone to not get hurt. We have a very proactive safety program where I work. We have monthly safety meetings for PM's and Supt's (sometimes the foremen are invited). That information is then supposed to be gone over at the weekly meetings at the various jobs. Our Safety Director has recently started to grab up a laborer or carpenter to walk with him when he goes to the jobs, and that seems to be having a positive effect. Showing guys why it's not safe as opposed to sitting through yet another toolbox meeting that the guy probably don't understand anyway.
 

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My corporate overlords are of the opinion that you shouldn't have to bribe someone to not get hurt. We have a very proactive safety program where I work. We have monthly safety meetings for PM's and Supt's (sometimes the foremen are invited). That information is then supposed to be gone over at the weekly meetings at the various jobs. Our Safety Director has recently started to grab up a laborer or carpenter to walk with him when he goes to the jobs, and that seems to be having a positive effect. Showing guys why it's not safe as opposed to sitting through yet another toolbox meeting that the guy probably don't understand anyway.
IMO, that is the key. Just barking out orders "Hey, don't do it like that, it's not safe" isn't nearly as effective as "Hey man, you're about one wrong move from doing THIS"...."See how easy that happened? Wouldn't take much for that to go 'to far', and you to do the same thing...only by accident. Gotta be careful :) " In a NORMAL tone of voice. Not threatening to their job...not like "I'm in charge and I said so". Just talking to them.

Most people, especially in this industry, tend to 'bull up' when barked at.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Do you think that when laborers are being unsafe, it is because they don't realize how unsafe a particular task is or they believe it is the quicker way to do something?

I agree that the proactive approach is definitely the way to go when training on safety. In my experience, incentive programs only reward workers for not reporting incidents, not necessarily being any more safe.
 

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Do you think that when laborers are being unsafe, it is because they don't realize how unsafe a particular task is or they believe it is the quicker way to do something?

I agree that the proactive approach is definitely the way to go when training on safety. In my experience, incentive programs only reward workers for not reporting incidents, not necessarily being any more safe.
Every workplace has the occasional "cowboy"...ya know the "ehhh, I'm alright, don't worry. I've done it this way a million times." guy, but I think (or maybe I just hope) that most of the time it's just that the danger is unrealized.

You're exactly right on the incentive programs. All it does is keep minor injuries from being reported. "It's November...it's just a small cut...our incentive money comes in one more month, so....F it, it'll be ok." Half the point of reporting it, even with NO injury would be to correct the problem that caused or almost caused the injury in the first place.
 

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The Ultimate Wire Hider
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My safety policy states that if you fall, you are fired before you hit the ground.
 

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Best way is to get your AZZ walking around the job site and point out whatever it is that is unsafe.

However, the GC must also set the example by providing necessary safety equipment, then make certain it is being used properly, and also having cords, ladders, tools etc in good condition and proper working order.
 

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However, the GC must also set the example by providing necessary safety equipment, then make certain it is being used properly, and also having cords, ladders, tools etc in good condition and proper working order.
I'm amazed at what some otherwise reputable guys will let go on their sites. Electrical stuff in particular - bar wires, power cords patched with duct tape, power distribution boxes cobbled together with old receptacles and 2x4's.

Generally independent guys, who could learn something by spending some time on a union site.
 

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We organised an on site talk to all the workers by a bricklayer who had fallen through a roof and was left paralysed. By far the most effective way of getting a message across.
 
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