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Angus,
my floor was 650sq/ft over an uneven concrete slab. I sympathize with you on your install. The corners seem to slightly curl so butting must have been tough.
Wiz, while you can install floor tiles butted why would you? Something is going to fill that joint or the product sizing will burn you.
BTW, don't be an ass. I was nailing wood before your store opened.

olzo
 

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Project Manager HFH..
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I still want to know how grout fills voids under the tile......
 
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Starving Tile Artist
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Wiz, while you can install floor tiles butted why would you? Something is going to fill that joint or the product sizing will burn you.
BTW, don't be an ass. I was nailing wood before your store opened.

olzo
You would butt floor tiles upon customer request. If you didn't notice, I also stated that grout should be used.

I'm going to assume you expect me to be an ass since you added that notation. Now you have to expect me to be an ass with you simply because you made that notation.

I personally am a 3rd generation Carpenter and 2nd generation Tile setter. I've been nailing wood on a proffessional level for 21 years myself. I have been setting tile on a proffessional level for over 18 years.

By your earlier statement in post #5, you have shown that you knowledge of tile installation isn't up to proffessional level.

Don't cry, they are just words.
 

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Tile Contractor
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JumboJack: "I still want to know how grout fills voids under the tile......"
JJ the voids they are talking about are the edges and the corners under the tiles that almost always never get 100% bonded with thinset. When grout is installed properly it is pressed into the joints and will squeeze /into those voids and help to reinforce the tiles edges.:) It's in all the books!:)
 

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Last time I highjack this thread.

Since my professionalism has been called into question, I can't let this sit.

You may be a second or third generation so you have a start on me. But, it's how you finish. This may or may not describe you but I love to compete with the "that's the way we always do it guys". Pull out the TCNA and go to town.

I believe I answered the OP's question and the TCNA guidelines provided by Angus confirms that. Why did you add that some tiles don't need grout since it didn't pertain to the OP's product? Trying to confuse him? I think my advice is the standard for his particular tile. If you want to disagree on this point for his product then show me your pictures and the manufacturers
recommendation.

Second, I wouldn't install a product to the homeowners request if I knew it was the wrong thing to do just to get the job. I have walked away from those jobs telling the HO to pick someone else.

Third, search on this website about having the homeowner sign a waiver for the improper installation of materials. As the pro you are still liable in most cases for the improper install. If the OP follows your original advice/suggestion about no grout then he's on the hook.

Grout does support the edges of the tile where no thinset may have gotten. A packed grout joint is going to fill below the edge and of course protect the edge from chipping. While full coverage is best, ANSI standards are 80-95% uniforn thinset coverage. Grout supports that small void that's left.

You can be whatever you "expect" to be. Just try to be a Pro about it.

olzo
 

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Starving Tile Artist
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JJ the voids they are talking about are the edges and the corners under the tiles that almost always never get 100% bonded with thinset. When grout is installed properly it is pressed into the joints and will squeeze /into those voids and help to reinforce the tiles edges.:) It's in all the books!:)
Bud, while we all respect your status and knowledge, this is not the terminology that was implied concerning voids "under" the tile. Thank you for providing the proper terminology.
 

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Starving Tile Artist
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Last time I highjack this thread.

Since my professionalism has been called into question, I can't let this sit.

You may be a second or third generation so you have a start on me. But, it's how you finish. This may or may not describe you but I love to compete with the "that's the way we always do it guys". Pull out the TCNA and go to town.

I believe I answered the OP's question and the TCNA guidelines provided by Angus confirms that. Why did you add that some tiles don't need grout since it didn't pertain to the OP's product? Trying to confuse him? I think my advice is the standard for his particular tile. If you want to disagree on this point for his product then show me your pictures and the manufacturers
recommendation.

Second, I wouldn't install a product to the homeowners request if I knew it was the wrong thing to do just to get the job. I have walked away from those jobs telling the HO to pick someone else.

Third, search on this website about having the homeowner sign a waiver for the improper installation of materials. As the pro you are still liable in most cases for the improper install. If the OP follows your original advice/suggestion about no grout then he's on the hook.

Grout does support the edges of the tile where no thinset may have gotten. A packed grout joint is going to fill below the edge and of course protect the edge from chipping. While full coverage is best, ANSI standards are 80-95% uniforn thinset coverage. Grout supports that small void that's left.

You can be whatever you "expect" to be. Just try to be a Pro about it.

olzo
I stand by your own comments before Bud's intervention to support my case.

As soon as I am available to play games I will produce an example of tiles that are not advised to have a grout application.

BTW, I never stated they would be floor tiles.
http://www.sinksfaucetsandmore.com/index.asp?PageAction=VIEWPROD&ProdID=2526

And you stated yourself that you had installed a butted tile floor!
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
Thanks guys. You have all been very helpful and I believe, after reading all your answers that I will NOT but them but rather lay them with a very thin grout line. Once again, thanks
 

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Eric,
Though you haven't given much detail about your job (slab/wood underlayment, tile size), I will tell you how I laid my tile over a concrete slab. Later, Wiz will tell us how to cut ungrouted wall tile around electrical boxes.:whistling

My room was an uneven "L" shaped basement slab. The large part of the "L" was about 14'x40'. The smaller part about 10'x10'. There was a 3/4" hump where the two parts met.
I set control lines and snap the line with an inkline because of it's thin line.At first I hoped to use a 1/8" grout joinrt but the best size was 3/16". I used a longer trowel to help float over the slab. I also back buttered the tile.
The tiles were staggered but avoid creating a regular pattern. Mix up the starter tile size alot.

Good luck.

olzo
 
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