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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello!

Are there any issues with running NMD wiring through a wall made of 2x3 studs and plates? This is an existing wall in a 1957 house. The wall is plaster on sand coat on 3/8" gypsum board lath. One side of the wall is removed and the other remains intact. I'm planning on boring holes for NMD 14-2 wiring allowing a min clearance of 1 1/4" from the inside edge of the intact wall to the hole edge. On the opened side of the wall, I'm planning on protecting the cables with metal plates wherever the wires go through structure (Wires would be stapled to the studs at a max of 12" from metal electrical outlet boxes and on the vertical runs the cables would be supported within 4 1/2 feet). I'm concerned about NEC article 300.4(D) "Cables and Raceways Parallel to Framing Members and Furring Strips". Does that apply in this case? I'm asking because the cables running vertically along the studs would be stapled at a distance of less than 1 1/4" from the edge of the 2x3s. Would I need to offset the cables 1 1/4" from the studs?

Also, I don't see any but... just in case... are there any issues with fishing cable through 2x3 stud walls that have not been opened up?

Since it is so hard to get information on CEC I'm asking about NEC rules but if someone knows about CEC (Quebec) then so much the better.

Thank you.
 

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I'd probably notch it on the exposed side thereby leaving plenty of room for screws that might go in the wall on the opposite side.
 

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You are really over thinking it.
 

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Thank you. That was useful.
The problem is the question you are asking is too simple, I mean a first year apprentice would know the answer. This is a contracting forum not a DIY forum introduce yourself and explain why you are asking these really simple questions.

...and I'l give you the benefit of the doubt on this one ...don't listen to Aptpupil his answer was BS.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks dielectricunion. The use of EMT would work well as long as I don't have multiple wires to run through it (derating issue). When I looked at using EMT on another occasion, I was told that it needed to be grounded at both ends... seemed more work than I wanted to do. I'm not an electrician and I just want to set up the job so the electrician can do it with the least work and time$$$. In the renovations I've done, I have always worked with 2x4 walls and never had to deal with this issue. I just want to know what the standard (and to code) practice is.

Thank you also Inner10. Your comments are as useful as ever. I took a quick look at some of your numerous, intelligent and to-the-point comments on many posts and I find your use of the letter "v" in the word "fvck" and "fvcking" to be quite ingenious and will be remembered as a major contribution. "Fvck Corian" was particularly inspiring. Oh... and "vag" is good too. I think I will go to the DIY site... your answer was way too technical and obviously I can't fully appreciate the years of experience and hard work behind your expertise. I am in awe.
 

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Tall Moose
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Oh you two :jester:

But seriously...If you're asking these questions, it means you're not qualified to do the work. Hire a pro. Have you even called your sparky? You sound like you haven't spent a week in the trades...

Getting info about the CEC, NEC, IRC or NBC is not difficult to do at all....go to the local college, buy the code book and read the damned thing.

Not everything is on the internet!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
My CV

I'm not an electrician. Due to a work accident which makes it difficult for me to lug around heavy material without putting me out of commission for a week (and there's plenty of heavy stuff to lug around in my trade), I am a (now) retired elevator mechanic... so I am not trained for residential electrical (although elevator mechanics do get to pull wire a lot and play with high voltage). I am doing renovations on houses that I will flip, therefore making a living from that. I will be having electrical work done by an electrician. I just want to know what to expect as far as code compliance goes (also for my own enrichment). I hope that I can better prepare for the electrician and perhaps save on some of the costs that the he/she will charge me for a second visit or for doing stuff I could have done ahead of time. For my requirements, I don't see the need to buy the code manuals since I'm not going to be responsible for that part of the work. I'm looking at the NEC because the information is readily available on-line while the CSA is closely guarding the CEC information (they want you to buy the books).

Mine was just a question about one paragraph that was bothering me in the NEC and I thought I could ask for some clarification from some tradesmen. I didn't think it would be such a big deal that I would need to give out my credentials. I've searched this site for the information I'm looking for and I found some questions by tradesmen about 2x3 walls (some of the questions were very basic and nobody questioned the intelligence or experience of those tradesmen) but nothing on the particular chapter that I am questioning. If my question is so stupid, then please let me know how. If you just look at some of the answers I got on, what I believe to be, a simple question then why am I being blasted for my lack of experience. Telling me that I'm overthinking it or that my question is below a particular tradesman's consideration and then leaving it hanging... really is useless. If it is a waste of someones fingertips to respond then... just don't.

Thank you for anyone who helps or tries to help.
 

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Grounding EMT is trivial work and useful besides (provides ground!) Whether an inspector will let you fish is 50-50. If as you say you're going to have an electrician do it then why not have him or her look at it and discuss with you?
 

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Capra Aegagrus
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I'm looking at the NEC because the information is readily available on-line while the CSA is closely guarding the CEC information (they want you to buy the books).
Trust me, they want you to buy the books in the US also.

Though the US and CA versions are similar, they are not the same. You really should be researching the code that applies in your area.

I paid for my copy of the NEC, and I've paid a few inspectors for help with proper interpretation of it. :censored: If you'd care to help me with those expenses, I'd be happy to help you understand a code that doesn't apply to you. :whistling
 

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I'm not an electrician. Due to a work accident which makes it difficult for me to lug around heavy material without putting me out of commission for a week (and there's plenty of heavy stuff to lug around in my trade), I am a (now) retired elevator mechanic... so I am not trained for residential electrical (although elevator mechanics do get to pull wire a lot and play with high voltage). I am doing renovations on houses that I will flip, therefore making a living from that. I will be having electrical work done by an electrician. I just want to know what to expect as far as code compliance goes (also for my own enrichment). I hope that I can better prepare for the electrician and perhaps save on some of the costs that the he/she will charge me for a second visit or for doing stuff I could have done ahead of time. For my requirements, I don't see the need to buy the code manuals since I'm not going to be responsible for that part of the work. I'm looking at the NEC because the information is readily available on-line while the CSA is closely guarding the CEC information (they want you to buy the books).

Mine was just a question about one paragraph that was bothering me in the NEC and I thought I could ask for some clarification from some tradesmen. I didn't think it would be such a big deal that I would need to give out my credentials. I've searched this site for the information I'm looking for and I found some questions by tradesmen about 2x3 walls (some of the questions were very basic and nobody questioned the intelligence or experience of those tradesmen) but nothing on the particular chapter that I am questioning. If my question is so stupid, then please let me know how. If you just look at some of the answers I got on, what I believe to be, a simple question then why am I being blasted for my lack of experience. Telling me that I'm overthinking it or that my question is below a particular tradesman's consideration and then leaving it hanging... really is useless. If it is a waste of someones fingertips to respond then... just don't.

Thank you for anyone who helps or tries to help.
There is nothing special you need to prepare for your electrician.

The CEC and NEC differ a little on this, 300.4(D) does not apply to CEC we would defer that to 2-108.
 
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