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Hi guys, I just got a sprayer. Since my business is a Handyman business and my jobs vary, I paint only occasionally. My sprayer is a Wagner 9150. My next job is an opaque oil/water clean-up stain, but the primer I'm planning on using is an oil. I've run latex through other sprayers and just knowing how much water and time it took to clean those, I'm concerned about running anything oil through my brand new machine. Is this something I should avoid doing, or can someone give me some reassurance and maybe some tips on cleaning it afterward? Appreciate any suggestions.
 

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I've never used any of the Wagner products, at least not in recent memory. If you run oil through it, you just need to clean it with thinner instead of water. Run as much thinner through until you are satisfied its clean. And whether I run latex or oil through an airless, after its all clean, I usually run thinner through it to keep it all lubed persay inside.
 

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socialgen said:
Hi guys, I just got a sprayer. Since my business is a Handyman business and my jobs vary, I paint only occasionally. My sprayer is a Wagner 9150. My next job is an opaque oil/water clean-up stain, but the primer I'm planning on using is an oil. I've run latex through other sprayers and just knowing how much water and time it took to clean those, I'm concerned about running anything oil through my brand new machine. Is this something I should avoid doing, or can someone give me some reassurance and maybe some tips on cleaning it afterward? Appreciate any suggestions.
Hi Socialgen ..What is the project you're doing? Others may have a different method but I've always run with the idea that if you're using a stain, priming isn't necessary a good idea. Is it a previously painted surface or bare wood?
 

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hey dale,

I'm staining the exterior of a house. The house is currently a faded dark brown and is practically bare wood in spots. I'll be staining it green. The Stain I'm using is what is called a solid color stain. It looks and acts much like standard paint, it's thick and opaque, only it does not blister or peel like paint. It happens to be some oil-latex formula which I don't understand completely (someone on this site probably knows better than I) except that it is water clean up. The manufacturer suggests a water based latex primer or exterior oil primer for certain tannined woods which bleed, such as cedar. I've had a suggestion to use oil primer, perhaps you understand better why? Anyway, I'm not sure what wood is beneath, but the current condition and color of the house leads me to take the precation and prime. Again, this stain is not transparent but opaque. I wasn't planning on tinting the primer as to really lighten it up prior to the new coats, but I'm re-thinking this (my thoughts and theories are always wavering). What are your thoughts now?

Originally I was concerned with the potential difficulty of getting the sprayer clean from using oils in it. I don't want to clog the thing up right away. I'm in-experienced enough to not know, but experienced and resourceful enough to do the job and research it to make it done right.
Thanks for your interest
Talk to you later.
Daymon
 

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Pro wall, Sounds like good advice.

[And whether I run latex or oil through an airless, after its all clean, I usually run thinner through it to keep it all lubed persay inside.]

Thanks
 

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It happens to be some oil-latex formula which I don't understand completely (someone on this site probably knows better than I) except that it is water clean up.
I don't do much exterior at all so the products (stains and whatnot) for these aren't my forte. But I do know some exterior latex house paints are described as "alkyd-modified vinyl-acrylic latex coatings". Is this what you are describing?

I recall several years back test driving a product, possibly made by Zinsser, called H2Oil which was an alkyd primer that you could supposedly clean up with soap/water. I didn't like it, wasn't very user friendly, stank bad, and clean up was a mess if it started drying on ya too quick. I wouldn't run anything like that through a sprayer.
 

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socialgen said:
hey dale,

I'm staining the exterior of a house. The house is currently a faded dark brown and is practically bare wood in spots. I'll be staining it green. The Stain I'm using is what is called a solid color stain. It looks and acts much like standard paint, it's thick and opaque, only it does not blister or peel like paint. It happens to be some oil-latex formula which I don't understand completely (someone on this site probably knows better than I) except that it is water clean up. The manufacturer suggests a water based latex primer or exterior oil primer for certain tannined woods which bleed, such as cedar. I've had a suggestion to use oil primer, perhaps you understand better why? Anyway, I'm not sure what wood is beneath, but the current condition and color of the house leads me to take the precation and prime. Again, this stain is not transparent but opaque. I wasn't planning on tinting the primer as to really lighten it up prior to the new coats, but I'm re-thinking this (my thoughts and theories are always wavering). What are your thoughts now?

Originally I was concerned with the potential difficulty of getting the sprayer clean from using oils in it. I don't want to clog the thing up right away. I'm in-experienced enough to not know, but experienced and resourceful enough to do the job and research it to make it done right.
Thanks for your interest
Talk to you later.
Daymon
Hi Social..Is whats on the house now a paint or a stain? When you say its almost bare in spots does it look like its just worn out and the wood is showing or is it peeling? If its peeling its probably paint and if it just looks worn thin its probably stain. If its paint and theres alot of bare spots you might want to prime to even out the finish. If you're using stain, it will sit on top of the paint areas and soak in the bare wood areas and possibly give you an uneven sheen so a primer may help seal the wood a bit and even it out.
If its a stain on it already I definately wouldn't prime..if its not fairly new wood it probably won't bleed through if its cedar or redwood etc. Even if you tint the primer you're still starting with a white base and the hideing ability of greens is really bad. If you end up priming you better brace yourself for possibily having to put on 3 coats for an even look so if you go that route bid it for possiby 4 coats. ( 1 prime 3 top). What product are you going to use and what kind of siding is it? lap...sheets...board and batten...hard board.etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
It's definitely a stain on the house now. In fact it's the original stain from 25 years ago when the house was built. The pressure washing brought it to a light brown almost bare wood look, but still brown. It's groved cedar sheets. The product is Behr plus 10 solid color stain oil-latex formula water clean-up 10 or 15 year warranty. I used it a number of years back on another house, about 7 years probably, and it has held up real nicely. I didn't prime then, but I was putting a green over light blue or grey rather than from a darker brown to a lighter green. I'll take all the info you said into consideration.
 

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Well... to answer my own question that started this post. Cleaning oil through the machine was easier than cleaning a latex through it with water. With lates It takes what seems like 5 gallons of water after pulling the filter and washing that first. I was afraid I would have to use an equal amount of thinner to get it clean, but I used less than a gallon of thinner to clean the oil. The thinner cut through the gunk quick and it ran clean in no time.

I did end up using a tinted oil primer prior to the staining. 1 coat primer, 2 coats stain (3 on one section where wood was very dry and sun bleached). The biggest downfall about the primer to me was the dry time, which the manufacturer recomends 12-24 hours to topcoat... vs the opaque stain which was considerably less and would allow for more coats on in a day and be done with it. I'd probably skip the primer next time.
 
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how do you like the 9150

Speaking of the 9150, that is one model I am considering to buy. How do you like it? I'm also looking at a Cambell Hausfield, they are about the same price but the latter uses a diaphram instead of the double piston like the wagner and I've heard the piston is better.

thanks.
 
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