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Boondockian
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Anyone seen or have one? To m it seems kind of pointless because you rarely are ripping lumber with one and in a crosscut, by the time the riving knife gets into the work, the cut is almost complete. I've never had a problem with plywood pinching the blade that a riving knife would prevent either.

According to this guy its neccessary.

Also said there was a guy who put down a saw with a stuck guard and it ran across the floor and up his leg cutting an artery. I find that kind of hard to believe bacause it would have to climb quite a way up yor leg to cut an artery and I doubt a blade spinning down after a cut would have enough force to lift the the saw up more than a few inches, especially if it had run across the floor beforehand.
 

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Boondockian
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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
Festool track saws have them.
Tracksaws(basically a circularsaw adapted for tablesaw use) are used for ripping, which is where riving knives are useful. How often do you find yourself ripping lumber(not sheetgoods) with a circular saw? Its normlly easier to get out a jobsite tablesaw for ripping(equipped with riving knife) for ripping unless its just a one off piece. Why put a safety feature on something which is useless for the day to day use of the tool and gets in the way of the day to day use in a lot of situations? How many of you run the tablesaw without all the guards simply because it gets in the way on occassion and its too much effort to put it back on.

I see it a just another part that will get damaged easily. All they are is a piece of sheet metal in line with the blade, have that sticking out of a tool on the side it gets set down on and how long until it gets bent, thereby creating a situation where the saw kicks back because the riving knife catches on the edge of the piece being cut and twists the saw to one side, all the while the operator isn't worried abut kickback because the saw ha a riving knife.
 

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Custom cabinetry
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I think it's a lame idea, but to answer your question: Yes I do rip a fair amount with my worm drive, if you saw how I did it too you'd flip out. I tell my guys all the time "Don't do what I do". By the time you get out the table saw I'll have the rips done. If there is a bunch to be done then I'll get out the table saw but if you can't rip a 2x4 with a worm drive you should reconsider carpentry.
 

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Boondockian
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I think it's a lame idea, but to answer your question: Yes I do rip a fair amount with my worm drive, if you saw how I did it too you'd flip out. I tell my guys all the time "Don't do what I do". By the time you get out the table saw I'll have the rips done. If there is a bunch to be done then I'll get out the table saw but if you can't rip a 2x4 with a worm drive you should reconsider carpentry.
I'm in the northeast so wormdrives aren't really the norm. But my point is its safer and you get a slightly better(more consistant) product off the table saw. I keep the table saw nearby and if I need something ripped once most likely I'll need it again so why not get out the right tool for the job.
 

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I only rip with a circ saw if the board is too long to handle on the table saw.
 

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A worm drive and a rip guide is a really quick way for one guy to rip a bunch of lumber down.
 

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This is just in time - I've been ripping pre-made fence panels plus individual boards to fit with a sidewinder and demo blade. Try ripping those on a TS.

And yes, I can get a good edge on the cut, but demo blades like to wander WAY more than I'd like.
 

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Straight line rip saws, can rip faster than you can feed it...
 
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