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I didn't do any trim this year, but I still went with the Makita.

It's all personal preference of course. Buy whatever you like.

The way I look at it, a Makita is more reliable. If I have a trim job and my saw conks out or is cutting wrong, I can easily lose the price difference between the two saws in a day. Especially if I have a helper or crew.
 

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Wood Craftsman
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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
so,....


Let me get your personal opinion pertaining to the questions I have for you below.....

In your opinion, do you think that I , (or anyone else that owns a Ridgid 12" SCMS ) would keep the saw If it did not perform as expected, if it did not make accurate cuts ....or kept coming out of alignment, or was difficult to get certain angles.....or was to heavy to lug around, or was to cheaply made , or was always breaking down, or was just a saw that was a regret.........:blink:






B
 

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Just returned the 12" and free sluv i got the other day. I could not get that saw to make a good cut. I tried 2 different blades, spent about 5 hours trying to dial it in and finally gave up.
Got the Dewalt 780 and stand.Tthe difference was night and day.

Tim
 

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Wood Craftsman
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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
Sorry to hear that,...I would do the same if I had that problem,,,

Don't know what to say,......:blink:

I am going on 10 years with mine....

Well,

Enjoy your Dewalt , it's a nice saw, .....:thumbsup:



B,
 

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Not that I'd ever buy a rigid mitre saw but...

IMO, the ridgid is among the worst in terms of bulk factor. The massive table/bed on that thing is atrocious.

I'd say the milwaukee/bosch axial is next in line, both seem like decent quality saws. But I'm not cutting 4x12"s on a daily basis.
 

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Everyone I've ever seen with that stand has told me they hate it.
I don't hate it at all. Just heavy. But being I never have to pick the whole thing up at the same time, it is not a problem.
 

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Artist and not a curator
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I stand by what I posted before. I wont really use the saw for some of the intricate designs I do with exotics, but for cutting base, crown, chair, casing, especially paint grade, its more than adequate. I've had the dewalt, used often the Makita, and Hitachi which all 4 were roughly the same quality, the Makita was somewhat better than all the rest but at that price point, the ridgid can't be beat.

If you want a really nice saw, like everything else, you're going to be doubling the cost, took me a long time to realize that. All the box store brands are relatively close in quality. From really good chisels to really good sanders to really good saws... They ain't found where homeowners usually shop.
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
I think everyone has their own likes and dislikes about what ever brand it is they like,...and some guys aren't brand loyal, (such as me) .....some tools I like are from Milwaukee, some are from Bosch, some by Dewalt , some by Ridgid ,and some by Festool..
.. It's actually all over the place.......

Granted the 12" Ridged is a little heavy , but when you put it on the SLUV. Stand it's not that bad, not bad at all......


JMPOV,


B,
 

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I really like the stand. Might have said that already. Rolls nice, folds up nice. Rolls to the tail gate, lean it, pick up the ass end, then it slides right in. ( sounds dirty) Same with their table saw. Some say it's too big and awkward but I feel it folds up nice and loads nice.

Guess as mentioned, to each their own...
 

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PrestigeR&D said:
so,.... Let me get your personal opinion pertaining to the questions I have for you below..... In your opinion, do you think that I , (or anyone else that owns a Ridgid 12" SCMS ) would keep the saw If it did not perform as expected, if it did not make accurate cuts ....or kept coming out of alignment, or was difficult to get certain angles.....or was to heavy to lug around, or was to cheaply made , or was always breaking down, or was just a saw that was a regret.........:blink: B
Nope, not suggesting that. I would think an older rigid would be a better saw than a new one.

It's my personal opinion that a newer rigid saw would be a poor investment. It might work great for years, or crap out in a matter of days. I've seen rigid tools that did both.

Not trying to step on toes. If you kept the saw ten years then I assumed that it was a good one.
 

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people complaining about how heavy it is, it's a stationary saw. and I've worked with guys who complained skil wormdrivers are too heavy, so yeah.
 

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It doesn't seem as stationary when I load/unload it a couple hundred times a year. The difference translates into moving an extra ton of weight per year.

Anyway that's just my preference.
 

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I've had that setup for 3+ years now and haven't had any trouble with the saw or stand. Would i rate it with a kapex, of course not. It's a solid setup and a great price. I don't care about the 150 lbs, that's really not that heavy. I mean it's on wheels. If the worst part of my day is lifting 150 lbs into or out of my trailer or truck then it was a damn good day.
 

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Finishing Carpenter
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I've had the 12" bosch (pre-axial) and it was heavy, but solid. The motor would slow down on cuts though, and it had one heck of a kick at start up. large scale, but not really suited to finishing.

Next was the 12" Milwaukee, that had the 1/10th degree digital readout. That was a really great feature. Saw was 73 lbs, and being a 12" saw the blade deflected- a lot. I had it mounted on the SLUV, and man that combo was one heavy sucker. the MSUV (??) was clunky, I was constantly fixing it. The slide out arms would sag no matter how much I adjusted them. it was a pig! and going up stairs? even though it had wheels it was a huge effort.

The brains eventually went out on the Milwaukee, the digital scale would read 60 degrees on any miter setting over 45, so it became a large anchor. (sold it on CL)

I tried one of the new generation Makita's, it was "ok" I guess, smooth kinda like a sewing machine. Lots and lots of gadget like controls, not intuitive though. Awkward sight lines IE: tough to see where your cut mark was.

Also tried a Dewalt, seemed ok, but the head had some serious wobble on the rails back and forth. Excellent sight lines, good scale.

Finally got a kapex. Light weight, tight on the rails, no deflection in the blade. The miter lock sucks big time, easily the worst of the saws that I tried. No easy way to creep up on an angle, and the detent lock-out just plain doesn't work worth a damn.

It desperately needs a way better scale, the left side basically disappears when you have a cut to the left, the bed of the saw blocks you view.

You are forced to use their miter-finder as the printed/imprinted scale is quite small. I've suggested to the dealer that a vernier scale with a small magnifier would be da-bomb but I got a glazed eye look on that one.

It folds up really small, motor starts and has no kick, accurate as all get out, vacuum/sawdust feature works really well, the motor rides on two rails that extend out front so you can get close to a wall.

It's a teriffic saw but it has a way to go yet.

Someone locally is selling a miter finder which is a knock off of the kapex miter finder. They've improved it with some features.

I'm old school though, I like to go around a room and measure all the (outside) corners and mark them down on a map. Saves time! I can do better pre-planning and be more efficient with my time rather than using the kapex miter finder which basically forces me to do one corner at a time.

That's why I want 1/10th degree vernier scale on the kapex. Fast, accurate, no pissing around with gadgets.
 

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Discussion Starter · #38 ·
I have heard several people talking about "blade deflection" with different SCMS's , brands,makes and models.....

More than likely It has nothing to do with the saw and everything to do with the blade. Thin kerf blades are prone to this- even with stabilizers built into them.

I have read about this problem in online forums with every miter saw that has been built and it was not the saw that caused the deflection in the end. When you switch over to a thicker kerf and blade design the problem goes away, especially on any 12" model.


I had it with a 12" Diablo on my axial glide.....went to a thicker kerf, the difference was like night and day. A good blade makes a huge difference on the results.



JMO,


B,
 

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I'm not dumb enough to think a makita made now and made 20 years ago are made from the same parts and materials or with the same craftsmanship/attention to detail. everything nowadays is made like crap
The Makita SCMS is the only miter saw still made in the USA. The new saws are every bit as good as the old ones.
 

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Focusing on solutions.
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I had a 12" rigid for a while. Sold it when I bought my bosch. Just had rigid tablesaw lay down on my Friday & left me in a lurch. I'm pretty sure I've bought my last rigid tool. I've bought quite a few rigid tools & everyone, except my router have let me down at one point or another.
 
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