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Yes, it reduces leakage a bit but I think its wasteful and annoying to terminate.

RG6 60/100 is more then enough for CATV, if its a main feed over 50 feet then I run RG11.

I only do quad on spec.
 

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Steve
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I use the 6 Quad and have never had a signal issue. I prefer to use the best rather than do the job twice. Buy the reel of cable and mass quantity of connectors, you will save money over time and have very happy clients.
 

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Yes it's overkill. But not if you sold that overkill.

None of the jobs I have done I have used quad-shield, even though I have a few spools sitting in storage.

If the client asks for it and will pay the extra price, then I will put it in.

If it is a really noisy environment, then I will put it in.

Otherwise, not worth it.

I did however standardize on a particular brand/model of cable. No more buying whatever was cheapest. This has helped as I know exactly what to expect when pulling and terminating.
 

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Contractor of the Month
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I use the 6 Quad and have never had a signal issue. I prefer to use the best rather than do the job twice. Buy the reel of cable and mass quantity of connectors, you will save money over time and have very happy clients.
Then you would be using tinned copper 95/100 not quad aluminum.

Surprise surprise I have never had a signal issue thanks to my cable either.

Quad causes problems because guys jam on il-fitting connectors when they don't know how to terminate it. Most issues I've had were with termination not cable. If you want better protection from interference go with tinned copper not aluminum sheild, its a better cable all around and terminates as fast and as easy as 60/100.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for all the input. It would seem their are a lot of opinions on the topic. I guess it has a lot to with what your experience has been.:whistling

Thanks to all that replied.:notworthy


Les
 

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I have heard that with RG 6 Quad poses problems with security camera runs where you eventually get ghosting after awhile.

Anyone encounter this issue?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I have heard that with RG 6 Quad poses problems with security camera runs where you eventually get ghosting after awhile.

Anyone encounter this issue?
As I understand it any RG6 is not to be used for CCTV. I always use RG59 w/solid copper core and 95% copper braid. So I have not had a ghosting issue here...................... that I know about.

Just checked my BP and heart rate and it was good so no ghost here.:thumbup:

Les
 

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Contractor of the Month
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As I understand it any RG6 is not to be used for CCTV. I always use RG59 w/solid copper core and 95% copper braid. So I have not had a ghosting issue here...................... that I know about.
Able, it was more of an issue with older cameras, I believe Panny was the first company that insisted on the use of 95% copper.

I believe the fact that its RG6 or RG59 is not all that relevant, just a bigger pipe. Its the sheilding that makes the differece.

From what I understand is

Al Braid + Al Foil = Best for CATV

Cu Braid = Best For CCTV

Tinned Cu Braid + Al Foil (aka True Digital Cable) = Digital + CCTV + CATV

They tin the copper braid to prevent galling or some reaction.

RG6 60/40 works fine for most short runs of CCTV, but its a knarly cable to deal with. I like UTP Baluns.
 

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difference between catv and cctv coax

There is a big difference between CATV and CCTV Coaxial Cable.
Could you explain the difference as I just purchased 500' of RG 6U CATV coax to rewire my house for Directv. Will this work for satellite or should I get CCTV ?
 

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The Dude
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I subbed direcTV installations for a while, RG-6U is what they required me to use. I figure they know best :)

Regular dual shield aluminum braid.
 

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I own stock in FotoMat!
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CATV = Community Antenna TeleVision...... or 'cable TV'. Your TV is hooked to a cable line to bring the programming in. This is what you see in your house and strung along the poles below the power lines along with the telephone lines.

CCTV = Closed Circuit TeleVision. The TV is basically a single-channel monitor hooked up to one or more on-site cameras. What you see in the gas stations and bars for security purposes. Usually combined ("Siamese" conductors) with small conductors for powering the camera, as well as additional conductors for pan/tilt/zoom controls.
 

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Use RG6 Quad Shield for Broadband (Cable TV) you need it for hi speed internet, Voice and 500 HDTV channels. Also install it properly. Tight turns, stuffing it to the wall or using closed HV electrical boxes or using electrical (Briscon) stapes to squeeze the wire change the distance between the center conductor and the shielding which changes the electrical characteristics and effects the bandwidth.
Use RG59 for analog cameras
Use Cat5 or 6 for IP digital cameras.
No exceptions. The cable will be there for a long while as the world of technology changes. If you skimp now you might have to rewire again.
 

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Old Timer
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I don't do residential wiring but I do commercial and industrial systems. I always use RG6/U for CCTV, CATV, and MATV systems (prisons), and supplement it with baluns w/UTP and fiber when required for long distances.

The main problem with coax is the termination. Use the proper sized for the coax and NEVER use twist-on connectors. Twist-on should banned from any installation and probably made illegal.
 

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NEVER use twist-on connectors.
Yeah they are junk, but if you install them correctly they are better than crimp-on connectors and don't distort the dielectric as much. I use snap and seal connectors exclusively.
 

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Old Timer
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I agree S&S are the best, but my second choice is crimp. Use the proper size with the right crimper (not junk for either) and you will be fine.

The problem with most crimp connections is using the wrong size crimp for the coax.

Way too many service issues have been resolved by replacing the twist-on connectors.
 

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Contractor of the Month
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I had about 4 sets of crimpers and I threw them in the garbage about 5 years ago....death to all crimp connectors!
 

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ace of trades
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Amen to that. Nobody should be using anything but compression RG6 ends. Crimp ends deform the cable jacket and compress the dialectric, putting the braid closer to the conductor. So for RG6Q, using a crimp end could end up making the cable comparable to or worse than regular RG6 with a compression end.

I don't find quad any more difficult to terminate than regular single shield RG6, yet the majority in the industry say otherwise. But I digress.

Most of the RG6 I pull ends up never getting used. Few people are utilizing more than a few of their RG6 jacks in the house. As long as the cables are properly terminated and installed (ie. 24" away from parallel runs of 120/240 VAC lines) the additional shielding of quad won't be needed. RG6 quad is more expensive and I've yet to experience a noticeable difference. That being said, unless you're incapable of properly terminating quad, you and your customer will never regret using it. If it's not pushing the budget to the point that other items are being cut from the bid, items which would make you more money, be it material or labor, then I say pull nothing but RG6Q, more power to ya!
 
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