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Professional Contractor
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You should be proud. There are a few items to critique but that is with ANY job. Rather than critique, I would like to offer a few tips.
1. Lay your curve radius out on a flat piece of concrete.
2. Lay your entire row out and make any needed back cuts.
3. Number your blocks.
4. Lay out the back of your radius where you are going to install with a piece of 3/4" PVC pipe.
5. Relocate your numbered blocks to the installation site and re-assemble.
6. Repeat same steps for remaining tiers.
Continuing to move the PVC up will help hold your lines perfectly vertical.
There are many ways to do it but this is the system we use because I am an obsessive compulsive anal perfectionist. (At least that what my guys say)
 

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hack of all trades
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1,144 Posts
Hardscaper said:
You should be proud. There are a few items to critique but that is with ANY job. Rather than critique, I would like to offer a few tips. 1. Lay your curve radius out on a flat piece of concrete. 2. Lay your entire row out and make any needed back cuts. 3. Number your blocks. 4. Lay out the back of your radius where you are going to install with a piece of 3/4" PVC pipe. 5. Relocate your numbered blocks to the installation site and re-assemble. 6. Repeat same steps for remaining tiers. Continuing to move the PVC up will help hold your lines perfectly vertical. There are many ways to do it but this is the system we use because I am an obsessive compulsive anal perfectionist. (At least that what my guys say)
Wow that sounds very time consuming but I'm sure it comes out great. What if you don't have a flat area to layout?
 

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Hack
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3,011 Posts
I think you did a good job, and you picked the right block for the step downs as well. I hate to see a nice stepped wall where someone has not had the common sense to think about how the steps look if there is not an appropriate end or corner block to finish the run.
Those gaps on a tight radius can be a pain. Just ensure that your radius courses are ABSOLUTELY level in both directions, and that minimizes the gaps for the most part.
Nice job for the first time sir.



Wow that sounds very time consuming but I'm sure it comes out great. What if you don't have a flat area to layout?
It may sound simple, but in most instances we would just find a centre point and run a line and a spray can to lay out our radii.
Our lead block installer was really good at just laying it out by eye.
 

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Professional Contractor
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58 Posts
Funny, but I'm not really sure. If I don't have room on the job site, I have a 40 x 60 concrete slab outside by the shop that we lay them out on. I have always done it this way after several jobs did not come out to my standards and I looked for a better way. I think for my crews it is actually faster, because they are so used to doing it this way.
We pre-manufacture a LOT of our work at the yard and shop. It shortens out time on the job and makes less of a mess at the customer's location.
This is just my way of doing things. I don't think it is any better than any other way that winds up in a professional quality project.
The only reason I even gave a tip was because I remember my first curved wall many years and I had to tear it down and rebuild it 3 times and I really wish someone would have given me a few pointers.
 

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hack of all trades
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Wow! I was joking but I guess I made a good guess. In Chicago, we buried my friends dog in a 36" wide strip of dirt next to his back slab patio. I'm sure the rats have eaten the bones by now.
 

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Hack
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3,011 Posts
Funny, but I'm not really sure. If I don't have room on the job site, I have a 40 x 60 concrete slab outside by the shop that we lay them out on. I have always done it this way after several jobs did not come out to my standards and I looked for a better way. I think for my crews it is actually faster, because they are so used to doing it this way.
We pre-manufacture a LOT of our work at the yard and shop. It shortens out time on the job and makes less of a mess at the customer's location.
This is just my way of doing things. I don't think it is any better than any other way that winds up in a professional quality project.
The only reason I even gave a tip was because I remember my first curved wall many years and I had to tear it down and rebuild it 3 times and I really wish someone would have given me a few pointers.
I think your way sounds great:thumbup:...I would have never though to pre fab when I was part of a crew.
The guys I worked with were just set in their ways, and preferred to do everything on site.
Prep the sub base, place the base ,place the base course of block, level the run, toe it in, and then stack away.
 

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Problem Solver
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24 Posts
Came out looking good - is something I would like to get crew to learn as that type of extra landscaping could really help turn a house and set it apart if could do in cost effective way. Thanks for sharing.
 
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