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I'm returning to a retaining wall that was repaired last fall after tree roots had cracked and made the wall structurally unstable. The wall is at a driveway and is approximately 5'4" x 30' x 8" with rebar and concrete every 36".

The wall was demolished down to the last course that stood above the asphalt (~4"). This course had been drying for about one week before reconstruction and stucco, but still retained some moisture due to being in contact with soil below grade, which probably contributed to the discoloration seen in this area.

After reconstruction, the wall was stuccoed with thoroseal foundation coating to match the house foundation coating. Unfortunately, I think the thoroseal was applied too thick, which led to superficial cracks. Also, application took several hours with recoating in areas that proved to have pinholes. This I believe caused discoloration/darkening/inconsistent color of the wall.

The wall seems sound structurally and water seems adequately shunted. It is a high moisture area, though, being that a grade runs into the backside of the wall it and it's constantly in the shade.

With this in mind, I have a few questions:
thoroseal stucco cracks.jpg


1. What's the best way to repair superficial, hairline cracks in the thoroseal stucco coat applied last fall?
2. If I use a polymer and acrylic adhesive, can I add another thoroseal coat and have it adequately bond to the existing thoroseal for it to last for let's say ~5 years?
3. If I can't match the color of the house sufficiently (it was probably basic gray thermoseal that has browned over the years), can I paint it and hope that it lasts for 5 years as well? Is there a color additive for thoroseal to better match the wall (small job, so this may be a problem).
4. Any other solutions?

Thanks in advance!
 

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Do you have a stucco dealer in your area, I think what you need is a elastomeric coating that is troweled on. We use Sto brand in my part of the country. They can tint the product to your color need. You could also use a elastomeric paint but I don’t think it would hold up as well. These coatings won’t stand up to a weed eater. Softer and more flexible than cement coatings.


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