Contractor Talk - Professional Construction and Remodeling Forum banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am an electrical contractor in California. A solar company recently contacted me and asked me if I was interested in working for them and being their RME or RMO. I have read in CSLB website and the License Law book that a RME needs to be actively involved with construction operations and work full time for the company. Does a RMO have to follow these requirements? What is the difference between an RMO and an RME?
Can a construction company or solar company have more than one RME or RMO. Can there be multiple RMEs all using their licenses to complete jobs for the same company? Or is their only one RME or RMO for all operations for a company?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
Layman's terms - The level of risk of being the RMO is stratospheric! As an RMO you are an officer of the corporation and hence absolutely responsible of EVERYTHING that goes on both what you know about and what you don't, and which you MUST be involved full time in every aspect of the contracting business.

An RME is a bit less risky but your still responsible and you must be supervising and checking all the jobs. DO NOT as an RME have anyone give you a position of running a crew on one project when your company has 500 installs in one year, visit each site and be the son of a bit*h QC guy (permits pulled, clean safe installs, finals done, site is safe, etc., etc.), REMEMBER YOU are responsible hence RESPONSIBLE managing employee or officer!

I wish someone gave me this advice 35 years ago before I have qualified almost 20 companies as both RMO and RME since the early 1980's.

Good luck and yes talk to the License Guru he knows his stuff!
 
  • Like
Reactions: paulgarett

·
Calif Licensing Expert
Joined
·
1,999 Posts
I don't remember seeing this in my thread, but I found it here. Thanks anyway Griz. I always appreciate the assist.

CA & AZ is mostly right. But the responsibility as an RME or RMO is exactly the same.

As an RME you have to work at least 32 hours a week for the company as an employee. If you are an RME, you can not be a qualifier on any other license. If you want to keep your current license active, you must be listed on the other license as an RMO with at least 20% ownership.

A license can have many RME's and RMO's, but they have to hold different classifications.

I hope this helps. Let me know if you have more questions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks a lot. I appreciate you response and way of expressing the information. It sounds to me if I am the RME for a solar company, that I would have to be in charge of all construction operations, including materials, hiring/firing, safety, job completion, code compliance, etc.

What about insurance? Who would be responsible for paying for insurance? The owners of the company or the RME?

How much power would the venture capitalists (owners of the company) have over me (the RME) regarding materials, hiring, hours of operation, job location, etc?
 

·
Calif Licensing Expert
Joined
·
1,999 Posts
When I said the responsibilities are the same for RMO/E I was referring to being the qualifier on the license. You would be responsible for all jobs that fall within your classification and that they are done to plans/spec/code. Hiring/firing? That would be up to your employer as to whether or not you had those duties.

Insurance? The employer would be responsible for carrying workers comp. But that doesn't mean that you could not carry your own general liability to protect your own assets.

I would assume the owners of the company would have full control over anything and everything regarding your job duties. But all of this could be negotiated within the employment contract.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top