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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I may be over to help a friend that got buried some commercial work for a few weeks.
I've only done residential,so I'm mulling over the changes in the equipment set up approach and safety concerns.

The project I'll be doing is a new one story wood framed,trussed building.
I'll be adding fake dormers,overhangs,a copula,possibly siding and roofing.

There's a lift on site for use,and saftey harnesses will be used when needed.Neither of which I've used before.

Since so much of this is new to me,I'm accepting an houry rate as apposed to a bid .Paid help will be provided for me .

My biggest concern is complying with all the OSHA requirements to avoid any fines.
I was given a basic OSHA instruction sheet for fall protection so I have that covered.
I tried searching for other printed material,but get links for books and on-line courses.

Does anyone have a quick,condensed link to the most common safety violations, or can anyone offer any experiences with OSHA that might shed some light on what I have to watch for?
 

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Hardhats, safety glasses, boots. The stuff is pretty much the same. The biggest enforcer of saftey will be by the general. Most of the commercial generals I work for have a onsite safety officer. That walks the site giving warning, sending guys home, or permently kicks them off the site.
 

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Noticed you said safety harness when necessary. Any time you are in a lift make sure it is on properly. OSHA is big on fall protection. Guardrails, personal fall arrest devices, safety nets, and limited access zones are the only acceptable means of fall protection. Use common sense. If OSHA will be a concern for you alot in the future take an OSHA course.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Noticed you said safety harness when necessary. Any time you are in a lift make sure it is on properly. OSHA is big on fall protection. Guardrails, personal fall arrest devices, safety nets, and limited access zones are the only acceptable means of fall protection. Use common sense. If OSHA will be a concern for you alot in the future take an OSHA course.
I got a quick rundown on the harness and lift use,saftey glasses and work boots are a gimme,I learned that pump-jacks are a no-no,unless all the nets and bars are in place.
I've also been reading up on the work zone protection rules,which seem pretty vague.Something about having a maze of safety lines set up on flat roof areas so a lot of effort would have to be involved to get to the edge.

A lot of learning for a few weeks of work,but it could pan out into more work down the road.I'll definitely consider the course if it seems profitable to remain on this side of the industry.

The hardest part may be the mindset to accomplish a days work within the framework of these considerations.
One thing is apparent,the extra time involved seeing everything is in place as required.
 

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It has been my experience that inspectors appreciate you making an effort to comply. Not all situations are clearly covered in any literature ( your gray area mentioned) and those are the times when some effort to comply will keep his ticket book in check.

If and when you meet the inspector just treat him like a well respected instructor and coat him with concern for safety and compliance. They love that kinda thing, as they should.
 

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yeah, faun, grovel and suck up. Direct eye contact is considered a challenge. Never run...it invokes the "chase instinct". If they present the cease and disist posture try "playing dead". If that doesn't work the only alternative is to face them directly and make yourself "BIG"

(pepper spray is also effective)
 

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If you haven't already, contact your insurance broker and let them know the change in your operations, i.e. doing a commercial job instead of only residential. The GC will more than likely require you to provide a certificate of insurance. If you are signing a contract with them, the best thing would be to just send over the section dealing with insurance to your broker, and then they will make sure that the certificate they issue will meet all the requirements laid out in the contract.
 

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yeah, faun, grovel and suck up. Direct eye contact is considered a challenge. Never run...it invokes the "chase instinct". If they present the cease and disist posture try "playing dead". If that doesn't work the only alternative is to face them directly and make yourself "BIG"

(pepper spray is also effective)

:laughing::laughing:
 

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You probably won't have any problems unless you pi$$ off another contractor who bid on the job or a local trades union and they sic them on you.

If you've been to OSHA classes and been certified that really helps to know the basic rules.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
If you haven't already, contact your insurance broker and let them know the change in your operations, i.e. doing a commercial job instead of only residential. The GC will more than likely require you to provide a certificate of insurance. If you are signing a contract with them, the best thing would be to just send over the section dealing with insurance to your broker, and then they will make sure that the certificate they issue will meet all the requirements laid out in the contract.
Thanks,

Almost forgot about that.


Talked to my agent today.
Since I was basically covered for residential only,they would consider this as incidental coverage on their part.
If I switch to more commercial work,I'd have to have the Policy switched over.Depending on coverage required it may only be a couple hundred more a year.
Not too bad ,considering the potential for more work here and the increase profit margin.
 
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