Contractor Talk - Professional Construction and Remodeling Forum banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
DGR,IABD
Joined
·
9,683 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
While there are several good software packages on the market that make commercial estimating a lot easier, there doesn't seem to be any good stuff for residential. Would anyone care to offer your method of residential estimating for new work and/or old work?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
117 Posts
Oops! I posted this response to the wrong thread earlier.

Here's the re-fire:

Mike and Pete,

I haven't found a "formula" for remod work that works well (for me or for the customer.) If the job is simply adding outlets/switches/lights to an existing circuit, I sometimes use $30 per "hole" (each gang or box) as a rule of thumb. Keep in mind that this part of NC is notoriously "low-wage" so the same work in the western part of my state would be more.

Most of the time, I visit the job, look it over, determine what is needed and bid it accordingly using Kentucky Windage and experience to calculate labor, material and a reasonable profit. I don't do "line item" quotes either, but I do spell out what my estimate includes and leave myself an "out" if we encounter anything unexpected inside the walls, etc.

For new home construction (custom pre-sold, I don't do spec houses), most builders in this area prefer a sq ft price. I usually figure around $1.45 per sq ft (heated) which does not include fixtures and bulbs. It does include a 200 amp serivce, two ceiling fans, two phone jacks wired with CAT5E, and two cable outlets. Additional jacks and fans are $50 each, a 400 amp service is more, and if the panel and meterback are more than 5 feet apart there is an extra charge, anything outside the footprint of the foundation (water pumps, pool equip, postlights or landscape lighting) is extra. The only draw back to this method is you tend to make next to nothing on a small house, since a 1400 sq ft house and 4100 sq ft house both have kitchens, WHs, bath circuits, arc fault BR circuits, a laundry room, etc, etc.

I am also interested in how my fellow electricians are figuring this sort of thing. If there is a simpler soultion that is both competitive and profitable, I would surely love to try it out here.

By the way, I LOVE the CT forums. Some very helpful and knowledgable folks here. I wish I'd found this place long ago.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
10 Posts
Remodel Prices

I have created a detailed spreadsheet for my residential remodel wiring. I'm an electrical contractor in Los Angeles where $50-$75 per box is the going rate. I charge around $62 per box, $100 for recessed cans...

Due to massive traffic gridlock, there's only 6 productive hours in a day, I have liability and workers comp insurance. There are russians working out of their trunk who'll low ball, but these prices are what real electricians charge.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
Romex Racer said:
I have created a detailed spreadsheet for my residential remodel wiring. I'm an electrical contractor in Los Angeles where $50-$75 per box is the going rate. I charge around $62 per box, $100 for recessed cans...

Due to massive traffic gridlock, there's only 6 productive hours in a day, I have liability and workers comp insurance. There are russians working out of their trunk who'll low ball, but these prices are what real electricians charge.
How about panel upgrade and rewiring an old houses?
Louis
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
Atricaudatus said:
Oops! I posted this response to the wrong thread earlier.

Here's the re-fire:

Mike and Pete,

I haven't found a "formula" for remod work that works well (for me or for the customer.) If the job is simply adding outlets/switches/lights to an existing circuit, I sometimes use $30 per "hole" (each gang or box) as a rule of thumb. Keep in mind that this part of NC is notoriously "low-wage" so the same work in the western part of my state would be more.

Most of the time, I visit the job, look it over, determine what is needed and bid it accordingly using Kentucky Windage and experience to calculate labor, material and a reasonable profit. I don't do "line item" quotes either, but I do spell out what my estimate includes and leave myself an "out" if we encounter anything unexpected inside the walls, etc.

For new home construction (custom pre-sold, I don't do spec houses), most builders in this area prefer a sq ft price. I usually figure around $1.45 per sq ft (heated) which does not include fixtures and bulbs. It does include a 200 amp serivce, two ceiling fans, two phone jacks wired with CAT5E, and two cable outlets. Additional jacks and fans are $50 each, a 400 amp service is more, and if the panel and meterback are more than 5 feet apart there is an extra charge, anything outside the footprint of the foundation (water pumps, pool equip, postlights or landscape lighting) is extra. The only draw back to this method is you tend to make next to nothing on a small house, since a 1400 sq ft house and 4100 sq ft house both have kitchens, WHs, bath circuits, arc fault BR circuits, a laundry room, etc, etc.

I am also interested in how my fellow electricians are figuring this sort of thing. If there is a simpler soultion that is both competitive and profitable, I would surely love to try it out here.

By the way, I LOVE the CT forums. Some very helpful and knowledgable folks here. I wish I'd found this place long ago.
What kind of wording you used for your "OUT"?
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top