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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm not real sure if this is the correct forum to post this in, but here it goes. I live in a very rural area of Kansas and don't have to deal with building codes locally but I am wanting to expand into some other locations that would require me to be up to code. I also just need to start getting a handle on building codes that affect what I do. This would all be in residential new and remodeling construction. What book, app, or website would I be looking for to best suit learning, referencing, and complying with the building codes?
 

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Building codes are relevant everywhere, just not so much enforced in some areas. If someone falls on your stairs because the top step is 1/4 inch taller and the bottom step is 1/4 shorter, even if there are 14 steps (which can not exceed 7 inch risers) You are out of code almost everywhere in the US, and liable for negligence lawsuits. The total difference between shortest and tallest riser cannot exceed .375 or 3/8" max) Just 1 example of the codes that you DO have to be dealing with locally. True probably not enforced in Hoxie, and to be honest probably about the same as in Colby, Hill city and Oakley. But There is still codes there, and I am so glad you are beginning to think about it. Kansas follows the International Building Code (IBC) 2012 guidelines for structural soundness as far as I am aware. Although some counties, or cities can supersede and ask for more. IBC 2012 should be found any place that sells books, or can be bought online I am sure. The cost for a hard copy book will be in the area of 250 dollars, a download could be as cheap as 75. But be aware, some cities/counties/states are stricter than the international code.
 

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GC/carpenter
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I would check with your AHJ. We are using the 2012 IRC, here in Cali. Actually we have our own set of code books called the CRC.
 

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I would check with your AHJ. We are using the 2012 IRC, here in Cali. Actually we have our own set of code books called the CRC.
Well of course Cali. would have their own, They have to include in every paragraph .............known to cause cancer in Cali. LOL
Texas has their own as well, basically because they just cant go along with everyone else, for the opposite reason as Cali.


I am only joking people, calm down.
 

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GC/carpenter
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otislilly said:
Well of course Cali. would have their own, They have to include in every paragraph .............known to cause cancer in Cali. LOL Texas has their own as well, basically because they just cant go along with everyone else, for the opposite reason as Cali. I am only joking people, calm down.
Well, it's not too far off the IRC, actually it's probably 95% the same. We have a unique seismic situation here, that's not prevalent in other parts of the country. Not saying other states don't have earthquakes, but here in Cali, we get them pretty much daily.
 

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Well, it's not too far off the IRC, actually it's probably 95% the same. We have a unique seismic situation here, that's not prevalent in other parts of the country. Not saying other states don't have earthquakes, but here in Cali, we get them pretty much daily.
Yes like I said many areas are more strict. about many things. Hurricane strapping, snow loads, seismic activity. There are geographic variations all over the US. But most states use IBC 2012 as a min. and get specific from there.
 

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GC/carpenter
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Here's the code book we use that's based on the International Residential Code. I believe the IBC is for multi family dwellings and buildings more then 3 stories.

image-1764421357.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Otislilly you from kansas?

What agency does one check with to see what version is adopted?
What does AHJ stand for?

Yes I knew that codes were supposed to be statewide but as stated they are just not enforced in my area.
 

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Sean
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No wonder the rest of the world has to see a week of photos of houses blown up after every thunderstorm out there. LOL.
Makes you wonder sometimes, huh?
Back to the OP - Code Check is a nice condensed guide that is def. worth checking out, searching on here for specific issues, sites like mine :whistling & the list can go on & on
AHJ = Authority Having Jurisdiction
 

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I am here in southeast kansas, we still use IBC 2006. All you need to do is go to the city hall and talk to the codes officer, or a higher head in city hall
 

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Otislilly you from kansas?

What agency does one check with to see what version is adopted?
What does AHJ stand for?

Yes I knew that codes were supposed to be statewide but as stated they are just not enforced in my area.
No, I have never been to Kansas.

Where do you check, well CarpenterSFO gave the best link
http://www.reedconstructiondata.com/building-codes/kansas/

Scroll down to
Authorities Having Jurisdiction (AHJ)
Structural Division of Facilities Management
Building Services
Phone: (785) 296-8899
Fax: (785) 296-8898
 

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Don't forget NFPA Life Safety 101 - there are a lot of code requirements in there as well. Don't get the code unless you like convoluted reading - someone at the local fire department should be able to tell you what applies to what you're doing, and possibly give you a copy of an interpretation that covers it. The books that give visual interpretation are pretty pricey.

Egress requirements and fire rating requirements are common issues that come up.
 

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I am here in southeast kansas, we still use IBC 2006. All you need to do is go to the city hall and talk to the codes officer, or a higher head in city hall
Sometimes it's the city or town; in unincorporated places it's the county.

You're doing the right thing trying to get a head start on the codes before talking to a permitting or code enforcement official. It's been covered elsewhere on C.T., but it makes a bad first impression with a building department by asking them questions along the order of "I want to build a house. How should I do that?" Do a little reading on-line or in the code check or other books, then you can go in and ask what the codes are in that area, ask if they have local amendments, and ask for any local building guidelines. I browsed around and found that Johnson County for example has some on-line code guides for specific projects such as decks. You can probably go into most jurisdictions in the state with Johnson County's deck guidelines, and use that as the starting point for a discussion about building a deck. The better prepared you are to have an intelligent discussion when you go in to a building department, the better the conversation will go.
 
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