Contractor Talk - Professional Construction and Remodeling Forum banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey,

Sorry but I lied on the intake form… I'm not a professional contractor. but hear me out. I needed the advice/expertise of pros.

I am a highly skilled woodworker. I have been professionally building high end, hand-made stringed instruments for over a decade. That is my passion and my career. But i'll be honest… things have been really hard (as it has been for all of us) since 2008 and I'm getting to the point where I'm going to have to start taking in income some other way to keep the bills paid.

Instruments is all I've done with my life… so my qualifications on paper aren't going to get me any cushy jobs. But I have been foreman to a few shops, I've had high pressure leadership jobs and I have a lot of skills.

So my question is… how difficult would it be for me to make a transition into carpentry? There are a ton of carpentry jobs in my area. I'm not looking to become full time or union or anything like that because I dont plan on making it a career switch… just hoping to get some side work to make some scratch to keep me afloat until the economy improves a bit more.

any advice/insight is greatly appreciated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
352 Posts
You may be over qualified for most crews. If you get into this trade, look for a finish crew or cabinet/Millwork shop that does high quality custom work.
Framers have a saying:
"we ain't building pianos"
 

·
Smarter than the brick...
Joined
·
298 Posts
I don't think you would have any trouble at all transitioning to finish carpentry skill wise, the part you may have trouble with would be going into a production environment.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,076 Posts
There are easier ways to pick up some scratch than being a part-time, beginning carpenter, but sure, give it a shot, who are we to say?

One one hand, your experience won't mean much to most contractors. Carpentry isn't rocket science, but there are methods and practices, lots of them, and success is all about efficiency, following directions, and hard work, especially for the low man on the totem pole. I'd keep quiet about it not being your main gig - no one likes a dilettante.

On the other hand, your experience means you're able to be careful, you know how to measure, etc. That places you well above the average beginner.

You might have better luck finding something temporary and full time, than part-time.

You might also look for work with a small kitchen and bath remodeler, rather than with a framing crew. Kitchen and bath remodeling includes a bunch of trades - tile, painting, etc. - where careful work is worth something. Small remodelers may be more interested in hiring someone for the duration of a project.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top