Contractor Talk - Professional Construction and Remodeling Forum banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I recieved a call from a gentleman who wants me to buy his house. I met with him last night and walked through it. I immediately noticed that the interior doorways were no where near square.

He told me that the home was built in 1927 and then moved to it's current site in the 1940's . It sits on a crawlspace that offers 5-6 feet of clearance. It is situated on a main road and 40 years ago they expanded and regraded it. Apparantly the home was jacked up and placed back on the regraded lot.

I do not have any experience with a problem like this and I am hoping that someone here can offer me some guidance. The members of this board are far more knowledgeable/concerned with doing things the right way than any local contractors I know.

I have included some pictures. I have more if needed. I hope to recieve some replies.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
318 Posts
Cogent,
If I were you, I would require the seller to have a home inspection done prior to moving any further on the deal.

One of the first things an inspector will do though is to place a marble on the floor and see if it rolls - indicating sag in the foundation.

Tim
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
TimWieneke said:
Cogent,
If I were you, I would require the seller to have a home inspection done prior to moving any further on the deal.

One of the first things an inspector will do though is to place a marble on the floor and see if it rolls - indicating sag in the foundation.

Tim

I am familiar with the marble trick. I always pay for a home inspection. I deal with motivated sellers. These people just want to get distressed properties off their hands. That is why they call me.

The seller's mother owned the house. She died two years ago. The nephew, a reknowned drywall installation technician attempted some repair work. But he was a total hack. I am just curious as to whether or not this a common repair. If the house cannot be salvaged in a cost effective manner, we can demolish it and build a new one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
378 Posts
CogentRES said:
I am familiar with the marble trick. I always pay for a home inspection. I deal with motivated sellers. These people just want to get distressed properties off their hands. That is why they call me.

The seller's mother owned the house. She died two years ago. The nephew, a reknowned drywall installation technician attempted some repair work. But he was a total hack. I am just curious as to whether or not this a common repair. If the house cannot be salvaged in a cost effective manner, we can demolish it and build a new one.
It is possible to retrofit a new foundation/basement,if the existing foundation is ok replacing any rotted wood and properly venting or sealing crawlspace will prevent future problems.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
318 Posts
I think I'm missing something. You mentioned the house having a problem and from the photos I thought you were referring to a foundation problem.

Is the only problem with the house that the interior doorways are not square?

Tim

BTW - A secondary reason I suggested the inspection is I'm seeing what my gut is telling me is either wood rot or wood-boring insect work on those beams.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
156 Posts
Looks to me that it would be fairly simple to replace the damaged beam with a new steel beam if that is all that is wrong. If the foundation is in good shape, just replace the old sagging beam. you will also have to find the source of what is causing the damage and remidie that as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
TimWieneke said:
I think I'm missing something. You mentioned the house having a problem and from the photos I thought you were referring to a foundation problem.

Is the only problem with the house that the interior doorways are not square?

Tim

BTW - A secondary reason I suggested the inspection is I'm seeing what my gut is telling me is either wood rot or wood-boring insect work on those beams.

There are areas of the floor which are much lower than others. It would seem that the problem is those cinder block columns the beam is resting on. They seem to have settled at different rates. It also appears that some of the columns have buckled.

I am going to have a couple companies give me a quote to replace the beams with steel, and install the steel supports.

However this along with the other rehab the house needs makes me want to see if I can get the seller to finance the property, we would demolish the existing home and build a new brick ranch. (most of the homes in the area are simple 1200sq/ft ranches)

I have to get back with the seller tomorrow.


Thanks everyone for your assistance. I appreciate it.
 

·
Custom Builder
Joined
·
4,406 Posts
I'll bet the foundation wall is leaking, all the water is running down to the pier footings and disrupting thier ability to remain in place.

You can sister the joists but it kinda looks like insect damage, I'd remove old after sistering and spray.

I think I'd also be thinking about the $$$$$. In a bad location that house might be a loss.

After lift you might be looking for some new doors, cabinets, and don't forget about wall repair.

Bob
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
318 Posts
Grumpy said:
[coughs... tear down... coughs]
Typical Northsider.... ;)

Hey look! Wrigley Field. Let's tear it down and put up condos! :cheesygri

Tim
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,573 Posts
LOL I'm ever further north than that. Everythign in the city is turning to condos :( BUT heck! I know why they are doing it. Ok let's do the math...

Buy a property zoned for multi family. $500,000
Tear it down and haul it away. $50,000 (just a guess)
Build a new 3 story condo, with 4 condominium units (counting basement) $500,000

Total investment: $1,050,000.

Sell 4 condominium units for $500,000 each... = 2,000,000

Investment - revenue = $950,000.00.

TEAR IT F'ING DOWN!
--------------------

But seriously though, I am not a Nurse, that's my wife's job. If the house is almost dead, I say youthenize(sp?) it. In my area, the North Shore, a single family house selling for $350,000 is worth 1 million after it is torn down and a 3,000 square ft. house rebuilt... Let's also not forget that houses built after WWII wern't meant to last much longer than 50 years without major renovations. Major renovations usually yield less profit than tear downs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Grumpy said:
TEAR IT F'ING DOWN!
--------------------

But seriously though, I am not a Nurse, that's my wife's job. If the house is almost dead, I say youthenize(sp?) it. In my area, the North Shore, a single family house selling for $350,000 is worth 1 million after it is torn down and a 3,000 square ft. house rebuilt... Let's also not forget that houses built after WWII wern't meant to last much longer than 50 years without major renovations. Major renovations usually yield less profit than tear downs.

Real estate is not worth quite that much here. That is probably a good thing. I don't have the capital to run multiple projects that size.

I am going to see if I can negotiate a land contract on the property. I have decided that I would rather tear it down and rebuild a new home. I am waiting for the seller and his brother to decide how much they are looking to get.

Thanks again for the responses.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top