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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Built my house 1994, all brick exterior, and used Caradco windows throughout. I getting ready to start replacing them a few at time. I have myself convinced to use 400 series Andersen Woodwright inserts for the DH's. The whole process seams pretty straightforward and won't be disturbing the existing jambs and casing.

The casements (2 and 3 sash units) have me scratching my head. I really don't want to disturb the existing frames as I see no way of reflashing other than pumping tubes of caulking in the crack. Has anyone installed a 400 series replacement in an existing frame? I haven't been able to find a measurement guide and I don't think it's as simple as measuring the width and height of the jamb from the inside (like with the DH's).
 

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I may be way off base here. Especially, since I never sold any Caradco wood windows and have no idea how they were built.

With that being said.... the problem with your operating casements (as I see it), is your reveals and stops in general, are quite different on a casement. Especially at the bottom with your crank hardware and jamb cover. You could probably still use the D/H sash packs in the openings without a problem (assuming you don't have an interior stepped stop that's part of the frame getting in the way), but you will probably end up with some filling to do where you remove the crank mechanism.

You shouldn't have any issues at all in the fixed units. Again, "assuming" no internal stops that are part of the frame itself.
 

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I have removed casement sashes, stops, and hardware, and installed insert type windows in the remaining existing jamb.

You can remove these items from your existing caradco, and see what it looks like. The stops are nailed in, so remove the stops carefully, and you can put it back together after you see what it looks like.

This isn't a method I reccomend in general, as insert replacements leave too much to chance in terms of the existing window frame to wall interface.

But I have done this a couple of times.
 

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I have removed casement sashes, stops, and hardware, and installed insert type windows in the remaining existing jamb.

You can remove these items from your existing caradco, and see what it looks like. The stops are nailed in, so remove the stops carefully, and you can put it back together after you see what it looks like.

This isn't a method I reccomend in general, as insert replacements leave too much to chance in terms of the existing window frame to wall interface.

But I have done this a couple of times.
I agree. Doing an insert on a casement isn't the best because of the stepped jambs most of them have. Even just using a jamb liner and sash pack which is what I think the the OP is suggesting, rather than a total "insert" replacement window.
 

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Just make sure those casement Caradco units have true tacked in stops and not mortised/milled ones that part of the frame. I've done quite a few units in a very large condo development that all had what I thought were the same series of Caradco casements. Very easy install for my retrofit Sunrise Vanguards in which new interior stop moldings hide the old stop and crank areas and then brickmold bend exterior cladding with the Van Mark trim former die. We paint the jambs and casings just to make uniform too. Little different than the "caulk and walk" type outfits.

Love for homeowners to do it the super nice way with total tear outs and the real good stuff like Marvin, Eagle, Andersen.

I ran into a unit in which I measure my normal way to preserve minimum glass loss last year and when I when to remove the interior sash stops I found them to be part of the frame. Completely blindsided and dumbfounded as it was the same darn looking window as the other units. This unit was on the other side of the site and possibly built by a different builder. That was a fun one. Lot's of new Mulitmaster blades were used to make the job right trying to precision cut those stops out.
 

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I ran into a unit in which I measure my normal way to preserve minimum glass loss last year and when I when to remove the interior sash stops I found them to be part of the frame. Completely blindsided and dumbfounded as it was the same darn looking window as the other units. This unit was on the other side of the site and possibly built by a different builder. That was a fun one. Lot's of new Mulitmaster blades were used to make the job right trying to precision cut those stops out.
Yup.... this is exactly what I'm worried about. You just said it a lot better.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the replies. I stopped in at the local lumber yard yesterday to look at the Andersen samples again. Good timing as the Andersen rep. was on site making his rounds. We talked windows for quite some time and he provided me a copy of their latest window guide.

While installing a 400 Series Casement replacement in an existing Caradco jamb/frame is possible, I've decided on complete removal and replacement. My problem with the Caradco casements is lower sash rot behind the aluminum cladding. I don't think the clad jambs have rot but really can't tell. So I'll just measure the outside opening brick to brick deduct a little and order a frame to frame replacement. The 400 series replacements come predrilled in the jambs along with a basic install kit.

I guess my flashing concern really wouldn't have gone away with an insert in the existing frame. I'll be relying on a caulked joint either way. I suppose once the old window is out I could try to use some flashing tape to span the gap between the sheathing and brick veneer.


Another question. The steel angle carrying the brick over the window opening needs paint which I'll take care of. I'm thinking about bending an aluminum cover, grinding a slit in the mortar on the top side and pointing in the aluminum. Just not sure if that's a good idea, might end up trapping moisture between the steel and aluminum. Any thoughts?
 

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Well, you could use a small amount of spray foam in the gap between the brick and sheeting around the window. Not the stuff from the box stores, but a closed cell, ultra low expansion window and door foam from the likes of OSI, Hilti or Alside.

You could also run a flashing tape around the opening to cover that gap as well. I would probably run the flashing tape if it were me.
 

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Caradco was suffering major issues during that time frame with the C200 series and Heritage. Rip them out completely and start from square one if you want my advice.

BTW,...those stop aren't nailed except for the bottom, they're milled rabbet.
 

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Milled rabbet casement stops and retrofitting an insert atop them would look terrible! Kind of like a typical Alside Ultramax with tons of vinyl and little glass.

Good idea to do it right and get rid of that old Caradco junk and take things down to the rough opening.
 

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Another question. The steel angle carrying the brick over the window opening needs paint which I'll take care of. I'm thinking about bending an aluminum cover, grinding a slit in the mortar on the top side and pointing in the aluminum. Just not sure if that's a good idea, might end up trapping moisture between the steel and aluminum. Any thoughts?



Placing dissimilar metals together is a no no,will set up a charge to accelerate corrosion of one ,think it would be the aluminum.
 

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It depends on the grades of steel and aluminum. There's only a .10v to .05v anodic difference between plain steel and aluminum. .15v is about the max you want to have for anything exposed to water.
Unless you live by the ocean. Galvinic action usually needs salt to work and et more salt the stronger it is.

Afaik that is. I get all my info from that pillar of incorruptible truth, Wikipedia.
 

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if you are not sure on the windows sizes you can take the window stopper and see how the window looks like
the other best way is to measure approx. then look for prices according to the series you are looking for, once you find the right place where you would like to buy your windows replacement, have one of their rep. to come over and measure all the windows.
when installing the windows make sure you apply silicone and insulate the window perimeter.
good luck
 
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