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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a fire restoration job that I've been asked to bid.

The fire started in the basement and burnt through to bedroom above. It was contained to only that area luckily.

I will have to replace 6 floor joists for sure, but I plan on replacing around 10-12 just to make sure.

There are 6 joists which are pretty well charred, one of them is burnt through. The floor sheathing above is burnt and falling apart so that will obviously be replaced.

The sill plate has about a 2' wide area which is pretty well charred and will have to be replaced.



After removing the burnt floor above, i will replace the floor joists one at a time. Temp. walls will be built under the existing walls of the bedroom above to help carry the load.

I was planning on replacing the floor joists, then accessing the girder from outside (under aluminum siding), cutting out about a 4' section, and splicing in a new section of 2x12.

Then, I will attach the new floor joists to the new section of sill plate using joist hangers.


Any other ideas as to how to go about this? Just wanted to see if anyone had a more efficient way to handle this

I'm meeting with the inspector tomorrow and hopefully will start work wednesday
 

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I've been in buildings which have been rebuilt after a fire and it was always easy to tell :-(

for those joists which don't 'have' to be replaced due to charred damage, may be more advisable to sister and use 1/2" carriage bolt to at specified width (I would still nail it off).

you might consider making a beam to lift the 1st floor ceiling weight off jacking against the basement floor-less force on the sill plate will make it for jacking when pulling it out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thats a good point, I didnt think about the weight still sitting on the sill plate.

I'll try building a beam and jacking it against the ceiling joists in the room above, with the jacks down in the basement. Only thing I'm worried about is cracking the plaster in the hallway by raising the ceiling weight off the sill.
 

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classic muscle
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Go find a Civil Engineer in your city that has experience in residential and or remodeling homes. Ask him to do a site visit and prepare a written plan for the replacement of the floor.

The inspector will appreciate the fact that a more experienced authorty is making the call based on structural calculations.

Follow the engineer's plan to the letter. If something were to happen in the future, the homowner has a structural plan to refer. It also covers you.
 
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