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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
First introduction- I'm a self employed contractor out of Central Vermont. I try to do mostly Energy renovation work, more commonly known as weatherization, I have a background in masonry, and tend to take on whatever comes my way. I hope this is in the right section, please tell me/ and mods please move it if it should be moved.

I have a client with a old farm house (post/gurt and balloon hybrid, weird) I believe its well over a hundred years old. Wet laid stone foundation. About 15 years ago an addition was added on, the abutting stone wall was removed at that time, I assume this, although it is possible that there was a previously an outbuilding in that location.

the stone foundation on the weather side of the house is pretty well shot. The homeowner can't afford right now to put a new foundation under the whole house, so I'm looking for a solution that will hold the house up and keep the weather out for a couple of years until we do the whole (%@#!#@ thing.

I'm thinking that since the top of the wall is where the largest problem is, that I will dig down and remove the stone until I'm down to something pretty solid. I will then lay 8" block back up, leaving room for a 2x8 PT to be placed between the block and the gurt.

Any other ideas? suggestions? comments on my approach?

Ill see what I can find for pictures.

BZ
 

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General Contractor
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Leave it alone and do it right when he has money. He will be paying twice for the same work... explain that to him. You need an architect, you need a permit, you need to have inspected. If any of this things not required in Vermont, why would you want to take the liability to do temporary structural repairs now just to tear them out later. What if you dig it up and something goes wrong (especially with stone foundations, its like opening a can of worms) the HO will hold you liable for all the damages and you end up building him a new foundation at your expense.

First introduction- I'm a self employed contractor out of Central Vermont. I try to do mostly Energy renovation work, more commonly known as weatherization, I have a background in masonry, and tend to take on whatever comes my way. I hope this is in the right section, please tell me/ and mods please move it if it should be moved.

I have a client with a old farm house (post/gurt and balloon hybrid, weird) I believe its well over a hundred years old. Wet laid stone foundation. About 15 years ago an addition was added on, the abutting stone wall was removed at that time, I assume this, although it is possible that there was a previously an outbuilding in that location.

the stone foundation on the weather side of the house is pretty well shot. The homeowner can't afford right now to put a new foundation under the whole house, so I'm looking for a solution that will hold the house up and keep the weather out for a couple of years until we do the whole (%@#!#@ thing.

I'm thinking that since the top of the wall is where the largest problem is, that I will dig down and remove the stone until I'm down to something pretty solid. I will then lay 8" block back up, leaving room for a 2x8 PT to be placed between the block and the gurt.

Any other ideas? suggestions? comments on my approach?

Ill see what I can find for pictures.

BZ
 

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I like Green things
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Dont get me started on maintaining a stone foundation. I have pulled out loose stones in a small section and re-laid with type n?? mortar.

I did this to my house, and it made me nervous. So be careful, do it the way it should be done, and follow your building codes. I would think you could do some temp. shoring from the outside or something.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I don't even need a building permit if i call it maintenance. I agree that its not a great idea to only repair part of it, only to do the whole thing later. Problem is that it needs to be done, should have been done a long time ago, but wasn't. I'm not particularly concerned with compromising the structural integrity. I'll know more once dig out the side of the house. If i end up needing to replace a large area I'm planning on supporting the house using some cribbing.

BZ
 

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General Contractor
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You can call it anything you like but this is: "I'm thinking that since the top of the wall is where the largest problem is, that I will dig down and remove the stone until I'm down to something pretty solid. I will then lay 8" block back up, leaving room for a 2x8 PT to be placed between the block and the gurt" structural repair and you have to get a drawing and get it approved, then have your work inspected.
You don't have location in your ID so if your municipality does not require a permit, then do it as you wish :thumbsup:


I don't even need a building permit if i call it maintenance. I agree that its not a great idea to only repair part of it, only to do the whole thing later. Problem is that it needs to be done, should have been done a long time ago, but wasn't. I'm not particularly concerned with compromising the structural integrity. I'll know more once dig out the side of the house. If i end up needing to replace a large area I'm planning on supporting the house using some cribbing.

BZ
 
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