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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Purchased the all-white house in 2001. It is only 960' and was probably considered a starter home back in the day. I have been renting it since 2003. Scraped/sanded and sprayed primer and Behr satin latex.

Scraped/sanded, brushed on Zinsseer primer and again sprayed Behr satin latex in 2013 (10 years).

After 7 years, it is again peeling badly. I began sanding yesterday. The south wall is bad almost to the roof. The east wall about four feet up. Some peeling on the NE wall. Some peeling along the lower, more shaded west wall.

What can I do to increase the time between paint jobs? Better materials? More coats? No spraying?

I assume that, ideally, it would be stripped down to the bare wood but I am not willing to spend the time and money (back in my rural, midwestern home town, it would be covered in vinyl siding :eek:).

I am certainly willing to spend the additional money on the best quality materials.

(The the stacked-stone foundation settled causing cold air intake and frozen pipes. The dirt was a temporary solution.)
 

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I don't use any of those primers. I used to use SW A100 oil based for spot priming. Now I use SW 100% acrylic semitransparent stain. Top coats SW Super paint or better after 6 months to a year after the stain.
 

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Best practice is to brush the primer, or back brush it.

You didn't say how you clean the surface before priming.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I failed to mention that the house in in Northern Colorado with a semi-arid environment with app. 14" of yearly rain.

Front photo from previous paint job.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I sanded the loose paint down to bare wood then pressure washed the house.

Thanks and I will be leaving for work now with no access to thread until evening.
 

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I failed to mention that the house in in Northern Colorado with a semi-arid environment with app. 14" of yearly rain.

Front photo from previous paint job.
I'd recommend air sealing on the inside as a first step to improving the building envelope.
 

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Looks like a lot of that siding has failed.
Maybe it's time to bite the bullet and correct all the issues? That opens up a huge can of worms but at some point I think you're going to have to deal with the fundamental problems.
 

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"Back in the day", a friend of mine who is the best painter I ever met, would have taken a propane torch and scraper to it. The guy was amazing...and fast. He probably could have had the whole house done in 3 days.

I think they frown on that type of thing these days though. (y)

But I agree...get to the underlying problem. Otherwise, just a waste of time and money.
 

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Zin oil based primer would be my first choice too. However if there's a moisture migration issue, time to go to Zin 123 latex primer.

SW Duration is the top for me. Last full house paint I did 2004 still looks like the day it was put on. Complete cleaning and prep done.

Have to thin Duration with water or XIM conditioner in the hotter months.

Addl --- any insulation in the wall cavities or no ?
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
At some point, insulation was blown in from the outside as there are plugs in the siding. I can only assume that it was not very effective with the lath and plaster catching it before it fell to the bottom plates (brings back memories of helping my dad do that to his parents house back in '79? I also remember helping to install vinyl siding on our farmhouse).

I sanded the north side today and it is almost as bad as the south side. Apparently, it does get some sun in the early morning. What do you folks use for sanding? Back in '01, I tried a belt sander (too heavy) and a random orbit sander (discs disintegrated/flew off). The last two jobs I used flap discs on my angle grinder and it seems to work pretty well

When I purchased it, we removed about eight layers of wallpaper and repaired the plaster. I will research air sealing and the paint products that were recommended.

Is spraying not acceptable on old houses with real wood? I sprayed Behr on my '86 tri-level back in '03 and two years ago (after 16 years), I sprayed another coat on all but the north side due to fading. There was no peeling as I had replaced most of the wood trim with hardboard.

I know a local painter who does high end, multiple month, high five-figure jobs on nicer/larger local homes. Although my old house has quadrupled (online...no appraisal) in value, the lot likely has more value and I assume that the house will one day be scraped so I hesitate to put too much money into it. Plus it has foundation issues.
 

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What do you folks use for sanding?
We don't. That house is under RRP and sanding is only allowed with a tool that has full dust collection and a HEPA vac. Scraping might be ok if you set up full RRP protocol.
What is your trade? Are you familiar with RRP?
Is this your own residence currently or are you the landlord?
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I agree with the lipstick statement.

I own the house and have been renting it since '03. I have been doing home repairs for 29 years and the early days, I painted a few houses but never anything with wood siding. I now refer painting to a friend with decades of experience whom I will also consult about this project.

On this project, I started with the scraper but the sander removes so much more material that I missed plus it smooths some of the rough edges. Good point about the RRP. Now I realize why it costs so much to paint those old homes. I was wearing an N95 dust mask but still... The tenant is currently on vacation and there are no children.
 

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In Delaware, the homeowner may remove lead paint. Contractors must be certified.
 

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In Delaware, the homeowner may remove lead paint. Contractors must be certified.
Yeah, but not the owner of a rental. Federal law, so all states.

The interpretation is the owner gets compensated for the work through rent, so they fall under the RRP law.

If you claim ignorance, you may only get a warning or a small fine if caught.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I had mentioned that I have been doing home repairs for 29 years but failed to mention that I have been getting paid for the work. I also mentioned that I wore an N95 mask...correction, it is a dual-cartridge P95 mask.

We Fix Houses---I have been using the Zin 123 latex primer for years. It was recomended and, judging by how difficult it is to remove form my skin, I assumed that it was a good product. What was the material on the house that you painted in 2004? How did you apply?
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I found someone recommending
WOODLIFE® Classic Clear Wood Preservative
on bare wood and then priming. Maybe that would be a good idea as it would/should soak into the wood as opposed to just lying on the surface?
 
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