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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How difficult is it to remove a whole HVAC system out of a house?

I want to buy a 1 year old Carrier 92% Furance and A/C system from the homeowner and was wondering if there is any specific steps that I need to take. I will be hiring a certified HVAC tech to install it however, I will be removing it from the house myself.


Thanks,

John
 

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I assume that it is a split system, with the compressor outside the house proper, with piping running to it. The EPA requires that only people certified in refrigerant removal clear the lines. To move a split system, the piping must be opened, and the refrigerant reclaimed.

I suggest that your HVAC mechanic both remove and replace your new unit
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Anti-Wingnut.

I have been rehabbing homes for nearly 20 years in the Cleveland, OH area. I always hire contractors to do the installs of new furnaces for me.

I have taught myself over the past 20 years to do tile work, kitchen cabinets, hardwood floor refinishing, electrical panel upgrades, window installation, plumbing, and even building new garages I just thought i would be able to save a little money by doing it myself. However, it looks like it would be best to have my HVAC guy remove it. Thank you again.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Once the system is drained, is there any additional special steps to take? For example, can the condensor then be disconnected from the supply lines? Do I need to remove the coil from the furnace or can I leave it connected to the furnace and pull it out in one piece? How difficult will it be to remove the supply lines that are connected to the condensor to the coil? Any special steps there? What's the best way to remove the sheet metal trunk that goes to the ducts? I was going to bring an angle grinder with a sheet metal cutter to just cut it out but I want to make it easy for the my installer once we get it back to the new house.

Thanks,

John
 

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John, you'll need to figure out how the system was installed then un-do it. Typically, the A-Coil sits on top of the furnace with a piece of galvanized plenum above that slides into another piece of plenum. It is this slip joint that should allow you to lift the upper piece of plenum up and slide the furnace/A-Coil out.

Removing the A-Coil from the furnace is not necessary but will make your job easier. It may be attached with sheet metal screws, possibly just silicone or foil tape.

After the lines are evacuated you can cut them. Make sure you cap and tape the cut ends so the system stays clean. Do this on the portion that remains with the house also.
 

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What is this homeowner you are buying this from going to do after the system is removed? Getting a new system?

If this is what they are doing, why don't you have the company that is installing the new system pull out the old one for you. They are already there and would pull it out anyway to put in the new stuff. Maybe not as nicely if they are going to junk it, but you could pay them to do it carefully so it can be reused. And maybe they could give you a good price to install it for you.

There is no way I would just let some guy come in and remove it. What happens if something is damaged, etc. What if he gets hurt, electocuted, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I'm guessing that the system isn't large enough because of the addition he built onto the existing house. 2 more bedrooms and a TV room.

The company installing the new one want's to charge him to remove the system carfully so that it's not damaged. If I remove it he's willing to lower the price from me.

Thanks,
John
 
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