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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am bidding on a bathroom remodel project that will have some patch work on a PLASTER wall w/lath behind it. My question is....can i install some wood backing, and just use pieces of drywall and hotmud? This seems like it would be an easy approach.
Thanks all,
Rick
 

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Yes you can install backing & drywall for the patch. I would be concerned that you get your substrate the proper thickness to match the existing wall. Pieces of drywall do you mean a piece for each patch or filling in the patch with pieces? I would go for the piece for each patch. Not a big fan of hot mud, but it will work if you don't try & rush it. My biggest concern would be matching the existing surface.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yes you can install backing & drywall for the patch. I would be concerned that you get your substrate the proper thickness to match the existing wall. Pieces of drywall do you mean a piece for each patch or filling in the patch with pieces? I would go for the piece for each patch. Not a big fan of hot mud, but it will work if you don't try & rush it. My biggest concern would be matching the existing surface.
Yes....I will come up with what ever the thickness of drywall to fill the area, then use screws,fiber tape, and hot mud fallowed by texture.
 

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Hot mud all the way. I actually prefer it because you can add a very thick coat without dealing with a ton of air pockets, and it sticks to just about anything.

A tip for mesh tape: I have found that using a spray adhesive (I use 3M Super 77) along your joint right before applying the tape ensures it won't come off the wall during mudding. It only takes a few seconds, but it lets you get more aggressive with your mud. Just be sure to protect the floor as it does mist.
 

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My issue with hot mud is I've seen too many times where it is applied and assumed to be a 1 coat solution. Generally looked bad & not feathered properly even with lots of sanding. If done using the typical 3 coat method(sometimes 4 on a highly visible job) it's fine.
 

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Build it better
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
My issue with hot mud is I've seen too many times where it is applied and assumed to be a 1 coat solution. Generally looked bad & not feathered properly even with lots of sanding. If done using the typical 3 coat method(sometimes 4 on a highly visible job) it's fine.
I could not agree with you more. I have always done at the bare minimum a 2 coat cover, but mostly 3 coats. It just looks better.
 
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